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Best of British: try these beef classics with a twist

Every day, over four million farmers pride themselves on keeping the nation fed. In the midst of the Coronavirus pandemic, we are relying on British farmers to dig deep and serve the nation.

Now there’s something you can do to help. Together with Morrisons, we celebrate British Farming for 24 hours. Get involved now in the UK’s biggest agricultural online event.

Rich and full of flavour
Rich and full of flavour

Championing the best of British beef, here AHDB shares some of the nation’s most loved recipes, with a little added twist.

Stilton stuffed rump steak

Serves four people

 

Ingredients

  • 4 x 175g/6oz lean rump steaks
  • 150g/5oz blue cheese e.g. Stilton
  • 15g/½oz butter, slightly softened
  • 15ml/1tbsp single cream
  • 30ml/2tbsp hazelnuts, finely chopped
  • Salt and milled black pepper
  • 30ml/2tbsp sunflower oil

For the sweet and sour onions:

    • 25g/1oz butter
    • 2 red onions, peeled, halved and sliced
    • 2 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
    • 5ml/1tbsp soft brown sugar
    • 200ml/7floz red wine
    • 60ml/4tbsp of good quality balsamic vinegar
    • 5ml/1tbsp redcurrant jelly

Method

  • Place the cheese, butter, cream and hazelnuts in a small bowl. Mash together and season.
  • Place the steaks on a chopping board and make a small incision at opposite ends of the steaks, taking care not to cut through the flesh.
  • Carefully open each pocket and fill with the cheese mixture. Secure each pocket with a cocktail stick, if required.
  • Place on to a plate, cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  • Prepare the sweet and sour onions; gently heat the butter in a pan and add the onion, cook for four to five minutes until soft. Add the remaining ingredients and cook for four to five minutes until caramelised, stirring occasionally.
  • To cook the steaks; heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan. Season the steaks on both sides and cook according to your preference.
  • Serve the steaks with a portion of the onion marmalade, a jacket potato and a side salad.

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Serve with all the trimmings
Serve with all the trimmings

Roast topside with marmalade glaze

Serves six people

 

Ingredients

  • 1 x 1.3kg/3lb lean beef topside, boneless rib or sirloin joint
  • Salt and freshly milled black pepper
  • 10ml/2tsp English mustard powder
  • 3 large garlic cloves, peeled and cut into slivers
  • 120ml/8tbsp Seville orange marmalade
  • 45ml/3tbsp fresh orange juice
  • 30ml/2tbsp freshly chopped flat-leaf parsley

Method

To cook rare: 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes
To cook medium: 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
To cook well done: 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes

  • Preheat the oven to gas mark 4-5,180-190degC, 350-375degF.
  • Place the topside joint on a chopping board, make several slits over the joint and season and rub with the mustard. Push the garlic slivers into the slits.
  • Place the joint on a metal rack in a large roasting tin and open roast for the preferred, calculated cooking time, basting occasionally with any rich beefy juices.
  • In a small bowl, mix together the marmalade, orange juice and parsley. Divide the mixture between two separate bowls.
  • 20-25 minutes before the end of the cooking time remove the joint and brush with the marmalade mixture from one of the bowls to glaze and return to the oven.
  • Serve the beef with roasted, new potatoes, parsnips, seasonal green vegetables, gravy and the untouched glaze from the second bowl.
Comfort food
Comfort food

Steak and kidney pudding

Serves six people

 

Ingredients

  • 900g/2lb lean chuck or rump steak, trimmed and cut into 2.5cm/1in cubes
  • 225-350g/8-12oz ox kidney, trimmed and cut into 2.5cm/1in cubes
  • 1 large onion, chopped v 350g/12oz flat cap or Portobello mushrooms, halved and sliced (optional)
  • 25g/1oz plain flour
  • 300ml/½pint stout or brown ale
  • 300ml/½pint good, hot beef stock, homemade, if preferred
  • 30ml/2tbsp Worcestershire or brown sauce
  • 1 sachet bouquet garni
  • Salt and freshly milled black pepper


For the suet pastry:

  • 350g/12oz self-raising flour
  • 5ml/1tsp baking powder
  • 175g/6oz shredded beef suet
  • 30ml/2tbsp freshly chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 300ml/½pint ice cold water
  • 25g/1oz butter

Method

  • In a large casserole dish heat the butter or dripping and cook the beef and kidney for four to five minutes, in batches until brown on all sides. Add the onions and mushrooms (if used) and cook for two minutes. Sprinkle over the flour and cook for one to two minutes.
  • Add the stout or brown ale, stock, Worcestershire or brown sauce, bouquet garni and season. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and cover and cook for 60-90 minutes until the meat is tender. Set aside to cool for 20 minutes and remove the bouquet garni.
  • Meanwhile, prepare the pastry: In a large bowl sift together the flour, baking powder and season. Add the suet and parsley and mix into the flour. When blended add enough water to bind to a soft, pliable dough. Cover and leave to rest for about 20 minutes.
  • Grease a 1.3-litre/three-pint pudding basin with the butter. Take a quarter of the pastry for the lid and set aside. Roll out the remaining pastry and line the pudding basin, leaving at least 1cm/½in of the pastry hanging over the edge of the basin.
  • Spoon the cooled meat filling into the basin and brush the edges of the pastry with water, then roll out the remaining pastry to cover the top. Place on top of the basin and press down well to seal.
  • Cover the basin with a double layer of greased foil or greaseproof paper, pleated in the middle (the pleats will allow the pudding to expand during cooking) and tie with string, making a little handle with extra string at each side, so you can lift the pudding out of the saucepan or steamer.
  • Steam the pudding on an upturned, heatproof plate or saucer in a large covered saucepan filled with hot water or a steamer for two hours, checking the water level regularly.
  • Remove the string and foil or paper. Serve the pudding either by spooning portions from the pudding basin or turn out whole onto a plate and serve with creamy mashed potatoes and peas.

Health benefits of British beef

  • A rich source of niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and zinc
  • A source of riboflavin, iron, potassium and phosphorus
  • Beef helps the body absorb more iron from other foods when eaten together

How to get involved in 24 Hours in Farming

How to get involved in 24 Hours in Farming
  • Simply tag your social media posts with #Farm24 and include @FarmersGuardian and @Morrisons
  • Show your working day
  • Show what makes you proud
  • Share the benefits of buying British
  • Show where food comes from
  • Show how you are keeping the nation fed

 

Take the pledge at FGinsight.com/GetInvolved and in return we will send you a pledge pack and lots of tips to get involved, so we collectively raise the voice of agriculture

 

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