Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

From the editor: Farming’s story needs a cast of communicators

An abundance of choice can be a wonderful thing, but it can also present challenges.



This is precisely what farming faces when it comes to societal attitudes to food and the impact that has on the demand for what farmers produce.

 

Our special insight in to the future of dairy products shows how the biggest dairy firms in the world are gearing up to stay relevant for a consumer base with shifting tastes and demands.

 

With wider choice than ever before it is understandable, as much as some may not like it, that traditional products are seeing their market share fall.

 

In dairy that might be liquid milk (or milk all together) being shunned; in red meat it may be a move away from traditional roasting joints in favour of convenience; or for cereal farmers it might be the fact many more consumers see wheat as something to be rationed within their diet.

 

The inescapable reality, however, is that times and tastes will always change and it is crucial farming finds its voice in order to communicate what it has to offer, rather than being defensive about what is sees as attacks.

 

This was brought home to me at the TEDxBristol conference last week, where a diverse range of voices and ideas merged to provoke debate.

 

With everything from robotics to Millennials under the microscope, one speaker argued there was now so much information available online many people had become less, not more, informed.

 

Her reasoning was there was now so much information at people’s fingertips they took it for granted, shunning curiosity and creating echo chambers which mirrored their own beliefs, rather than challenging ideas and assertions which came their way.

 

For me, this mirrors what is happening to farming: food is so abundant, cheap and disposable society takes it for granted and is therefore easily misled by arguments put forward by such savvy communicators as, say, the vegan movement.

 

Farming needs its own communicators to inspire those consumers why it is relevant because, whether we like it or not, an abundance of information means we have to work harder than ever before to make our voice heard amid the din.

 

And finally - after many, many decades Lord Plumb has earned his retirement. A true servant to farming, he has been an inspiration and guiding force for many.


Read More

From the editor: Are we careering towards a half-baked Brexit? From the editor: Are we careering towards a half-baked Brexit?
From the editor: Brexit brinkmanship must not use ag as trade pawn From the editor: Brexit brinkmanship must not use ag as trade pawn
From the editor: Ignoring mental health needs is the worst course of a action From the editor: Ignoring mental health needs is the worst course of a action
From the editor: More red tape is last thing farming industry needs From the editor: More red tape is last thing farming industry needs

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS