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Reader recipe: Manchester Tart by Emma Lander - 'My love of cooking came from my Nana'

In a new online series looking at recipes, we look to our readers to share their favourite bakes and dishes. Here, Emma Lander shares her recipe for Manchester tart.

My love of cooking came from my Nana who let me help her in the kitchen from a very young age.

 

I like to think that all those lessons from my Nana stood me in good stead for the hundreds of meals I have cooked at the farm.

 

My Manchester Tart was one of her classics, and it just happens to be my husband’s favourite too.

 

I’ve made this for birthdays and as make up-pie - nobody can keep an argument going over Manchester Tart.

 

Emma Lander, Cheshire.

 

Manchester Tart

 


You will need:

 

Dessert pastry, enough to line the bottom and sides of whichever dish you are using. I’m not going to get into a heated debate about pastry - make your own, don’t make your own. I did make my own and wished I hadn’t, as I hate making pastry and it never turns out well.

 


Jam - choose your favourite flavour

 


2 pints of custard

 


Two tablespoons of sugar

 


Desiccated coconut Sprinkles (optional)

 


Banana, sliced (optional)

 


Method:

 

Line your dish with the pastry and trim off any excess. Put a sheet of grease-proof paper on top and line with either baking beans or, I keep a bag of dried chickpeas in the draw to use for this.

 

Bake on 200 degrees for 10-20 minutes depending on the size of your dish.

 

While it bakes, boil two pints of milk in a pan. Mix four heaped tablespoons of custard powder, sugar and a little milk to make a rue.

 

Just before the milk comes to the boil, add the custard powder rue and stir. DON’T leave the custard.

 


If the custard does go lumpy, I usually get it back with a whisk but it is far easier to ensure it doesn’t go lumpy in the first place.

 


When the pastry is done, allow it to cool slightly and spread the jam over the top of it in a thin layer.

 


Add the banana and then pour the custard over the top. Make sure the custard is still quite hot if you are using banana as the heat softens and cooks the banana somewhat.

 


Sprinkle the coconut over the custard and allow it to cool. When it is cooled, refrigerate to allow it to set even more.

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