Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Young Farmer Focus: Jenni Lewis, 21 - 'Being a young person in the agricultural industry is not easy. Everything costs money'

Jenni Lewis, 21, farms beef cattle with a herd of Simmentals, Dexters and Aberdeen Angus cross. She grew up on a farm in a small village called Biddlesden where the family finished Fresian bulls for beef.

University: Being a young person in the agricultural industry is not easy. Everything costs money.

 

Land and equipment costs are rising, too, which makes it hard to increase my business, and I am having to make do with what I can.

 

Another challenge is how unpredictable the industry is, regarding disease and profits.

 

A big worry for me at the moment is bovine tuberculosis (TB). Last year, one of my in-calf Dexter heifers got an inconclusive, which meant she had to be isolated until the next test when she fortunately went clear.

 

However, she can never be moved now unless to slaughter under the new TB regulations.

 

Background: I grew up on a farm in a small village called Biddlesden, where we finished Friesian bulls for beef.

 

We brought them in as calves and raised them until between 18–24 months, where they were mainly fed on an intensive system.

 

When I was small I used to enjoy helping my parents feed the calves and as I got older, I started to give the calves names and remember being quite upset when they were sold at market.

 

But I got my first Dexter in September 2005 and my first Simmentals in May 2006, which I show every year all around the country.

 

I love having my own cattle and find it rewarding seeing all the hard work not going to waste at the end.

 

I am most proud of becoming the National Young Stockperson of the Year 2015, with a heifer I trained myself.

 

My business: I am currently self-employed doing relief milking and lambing throughout the year.

 

I have been milking for coming up to four years and I love seeing all the calves grow up, as well as the cows throughout their lactation and dry period. I also AI for the dairy farms I milk for and have got a few calves on the ground, alongside my own small herd of Dexter and Simmental cattle, which I breed from and show.

 

Future: My future plans are to keep doing what I am doing work-wise and build up my Simmental cattle. I will sell off any offspring which do not fit in to the herd.

 

And depending on TB tests I hope to continue showing and gaining even more experience with different breeds.


Read More

Young Farmer Focus: Lorna Sidebottom, 23 - 'Being a female farmer I'm often undermined by the lack of strength I have' Young Farmer Focus: Lorna Sidebottom, 23 - 'Being a female farmer I'm often undermined by the lack of strength I have'
Young farmer focus: Orla Kelly, 22 - 'Small victories continually encourage my passion for agriculture' Young farmer focus: Orla Kelly, 22 - 'Small victories continually encourage my passion for agriculture'
Young Farmer Focus: Romy Jackson, 26: 'It would be nice for consumers to reward farmers' kindness' Young Farmer Focus: Romy Jackson, 26: 'It would be nice for consumers to reward farmers' kindness'
Young Farmer Focus: Sarah and Duncan Howie - 'There's nothing more rewarding than waking up every morning to be running our own business' Young Farmer Focus: Sarah and Duncan Howie - 'There's nothing more rewarding than waking up every morning to be running our own business'

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS