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The UK needs to stop acting like a battered husband and find courage to leave the EU

The EU takes our money and constantly tells us what we can and can’t do. It’s time we plucked up the courage to leave on our own terms instead of cowering in fear like an abused spouse, says South Welsh smallholder David Herbert.

I talked last time about Brexit being an opportunity rather than a crisis, and as we edge ever nearer to Independence Day it seems as though those inside the corridors of power are hell-bent on sabotaging our opportunity to redefine global relationships and act as a catalyst for a new era of problem prevention rather than problem solving.

 

As a country, we were in a commanding position to lead by example and show other EU nations how to go about facilitating a successful and prosperous exit from a damaged and domineering relationship.

 

All we needed to do was to show some willing to get the job done.

 

Beaten husband

 

But, like a beaten husband, the Government – spurred on bizarrely by a mix of the militant left, an intransigent remainer cadre and a group of self-serving vipers already holding power in their venomous nests – is capitulating, cowering and too afraid to speak out or brave the change.

 

Let’s be perfectly honest here – if the EU was your spouse, constantly taking money from your coat pockets, laying stringent guidelines about what you are allowed to think/say/do, demanding you allow their exotic pets to live in your house whilst you take care of their vet and feed bills – then I’m fairly confident you’d be filing for divorce on the grounds of unreasonable behaviour.

 

Terminated

 

Then would come the question of who’s paying the child support and who has rights of visitation once the relationship is terminated.

 

A couple who split amicably may be able to come to an arrangement, whereas an acrimonious divorce will lead to further years of hurt as the ‘adults’ in the relationship bicker, slur and generally make things as difficult as possible for each other.

 

I repeat the call I made previously for all parties to come together and make this work.

 

It is not difficult – even Donald Trump has been able to thrash out a deal in a matter of hours – and judging by the media and the public, we here in the UK seem to consider ourselves as vastly superior in intellect and economical nous to the US premier.

 

Hurt

 

I accept this split will hurt emotionally and financially, at least in the short-term, but speaking as a man who has been beaten by a previous partner, a man who has lived through divorces (two of which were my parents divorcing each other after a tough split and a remarriage) I would have to echo the sentiments of domestic abuse charity, Refuge: “Recognising you are being abused is an important step.

 

“If you alter your behaviour because you are frightened of how your partner will react, you are being abused. Where you go from here is up to you. Although it may feel impossible now, you can rebuild your life free from fear.”

 

The decree nisi has been issued and signed, and personally, I can’t wait ‘til the decree absolute drops through the letter box.

 

David can be found tweeting at @hermitcrabeggs


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Welsh Government needs to stop squabbling with Westminster and get on with Brexit Welsh Government needs to stop squabbling with Westminster and get on with Brexit

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