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'Are Ewe Okay?' - Scottish Young Farmers launch mental health campaign

To coincide with Mental Health Awareness Week, the Scottish Association of Young Farmers’ has unveiled a new mental health campaign.

Alice   Singleton

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Alice   Singleton
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SAYFC chairman, Stuart Jamieson (centre) on the launch of 'Are Ewe Okay?'
SAYFC chairman, Stuart Jamieson (centre) on the launch of 'Are Ewe Okay?'

A new mental health campaign has been launched to encourage the rural youth to ’listen, talk and share’.

 

The Scottish Association of Young Farmers’ Clubs (SAYFC) unveiled its ’Are Ewe Okay?’ campaign to an audience at Ayr Show on Saturday (May 14, 2016).

 

With statistics stating nine out of ten young people facing poor mental health receive negative treatment from others, Stuart Jamieson, chairman of the SAYFC said a key focus for ’Are Ewe Okay?’ would be to encourage important conversations to break the stigma surrounding mental wellbeing.

 

Statistics

 

He said: "One in four people in Scotland will suffer from poor mental health at some point during their life. Everyone has mental health, it can be good, it can be less than good but everyone’s mental health is different as well as constantly changing, depending on many different aspects.

 

"SAYFC has 3,500 members who are aged between 14 and 30 years old so there are so many different life events and pressures going on during this period that can influence how they feel including education, relationships, employment, health and finance.

 

"This statistic is one of the reasons SAYFC has chosen to encourage those all-important conversations and break the stigma surrounding mental wellbeing.

 

"It is about looking out for each other by taking the time to listen, offering a situation where someone feels confident enough to talk or by sharing information to aid our members.

 

"Everyone can get involved by just asking ’Are Ewe Okay?’"

 

Awareness

 

The campaign will be delivered regularly through social media with the aim of specifically targeting the associations audience of young people living in Scotland’s rural communities.

 

By raising awareness of poor mental health triggers and conditions, the association hopes to aid members with the knowledge they need to recognise the signs, and how to seek help if someone is suffering.

 

Mr Jamieson continued: "Scotland’s population continues to rise reaching the highest ever total in 2014 with the National Records of Scotland (NRS) estimating a population of over 5.3 million.

 

"We already know that one in four people in Scotland will suffer from poor mental health but to put it into context, more than 1.3 million individuals in Scotland will face mental health challenges during their lifetime.

 

"And at SAYFC, 25 per cent of our membership equates to over 800 members.

 

"It is therefore more vital than ever that we raise awareness showcasing the help and support available whilst highlighting how others share the same mental health challenges.”

 


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Get involved

  • You can follow the campaign and pledge your support via the SAYFC website at www.sayfc.org/are-ewe-okay or keep up-to-date via social media using the #AreEweOkay
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