Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Beavers given protected status but shooting under licence still permitted

This means that from May 1 shooting will only be allowed under licences managed by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). 

Share This

Beavers given protected status but shooting under licence still permitted

Beavers in Scotland are to be added to the list of European Protected Species of Animals.

 

This means that from May 1 shooting will only be allowed under licences managed by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

 

In the decade since it became obvious that beavers had been illegally released into the Tay catchment, farmers and landowners have been allowed to shoot beavers without permission but this will no longer be possible in spite of evidence of rapidly increasing numbers.


Read More

Farmers speak of damage caused by beavers Farmers speak of damage caused by beavers
NE stops farmers from shooting wild birds to protect lambs and cropsNE stops farmers from shooting wild birds to protect lambs and crops
NFU expresses concerns about Forest of Dean beaver releaseNFU expresses concerns about Forest of Dean beaver release
Stunned farmers encouraged to ‘give agricultural land over to beavers’Stunned farmers encouraged to ‘give agricultural land over to beavers’

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said: “The Scottish Government believes in the highest standards of animal welfare – for both wild and domestic animals - and we felt it was high time that beavers enjoyed the same legal protection as other species like bats, dolphins, wildcats and otters.

 

Impact

“However, we recognise that beavers can have a significant impact on farming, particularly in areas like Strathmore, which is why we have been working closely with farmers and partner agencies to establish management plans, as well as a licensing system for culling when there is no other alternative.”

 

SNH chief executive Francesca Osowska said: “In readiness for beavers’ protected species status, SNH has been working with a range of partners, including Scottish Government, farmer and conservation bodies, to produce a strategy for beavers’ sustainable future.”

This will include on-farm non-lethal mitigation trials which are due to begin soon.

 

An SNH report published in October 2018 estimated about 430 beavers live in more than 100 active beaver territories on Tayside.

 

A 2012 survey estimated beaver numbers across the region at about 150 beavers in 40 territories.

 

Many farmers with beavers on their land believe this is a considerable underestimate.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS