Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

'Big data' could add £6.6 billion to global crop values

A Rabobank report claims the implementation of data-led farming will require fundamental changes to existing agricultural pratices


Twitter Facebook
Twitter Facebook
Large corporate farms will reportedly find it easier to fund a move to data-led farming
Large corporate farms will reportedly find it easier to fund a move to data-led farming

The use of ’big data’ in farming could add $10 billion (£6.64bn) per year to global crop output through yield increases, a Rabobank report has claimed.

 

The report, ’From Intuitive to Fact-Based Farming’, also highlights fundamental changes to current practices would be required to implement data-led agriculture.

 

There would also need to be an upheaval of the relationships between farmer, supplier and customer.

 

Rabobank analyst Harry Smit said: "Also known as smart farming, data-intensive farming utilises new sensor technology to collect and process data for many variables relevant to monitoring and optimising crop growth."

 

"This allows farmers to tailor inputs and fine-tune application rates and cultivation activities down to the square metre.

 

"Over time, aggregation of data from many farmers will drive the development of even better agronomic decisions that can be customised and automated."

 

The report’s publication comes weeks after UK ministers opened a new ’big data’ research centre for agricultural innovation at Rothamsted in Hertfordshire.

 

Experts also stated in the publication severe adaption would be required by the global industry to manage the cost of investment, claiming this was likely to be easiest among large corporate farms common in the US, Australia and South America.

 

Small and medium-sized farms will reportedly need to find a means to access this new technology and will face competitive pressure in doing so. This is expected to require increasing scale by increasing operations or becoming part of a large franchise or organisation.


Read More

Harvest pressure likely on grain markets Harvest pressure likely on grain markets
In support of a better decision In support of a better decision
Ministers open new centre for 'big data' research Ministers open new centre for 'big data' research

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS