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Booths celebrates two years of Fair Milk Scheme

Regional supermarket, Booths reviewed the impact its Fair Milk Scheme had on both farmers and customers.

Alice   Singleton

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Alice   Singleton
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Chairman of Booths, Edwin Booth and farmers Claire and Richard Barber
Chairman of Booths, Edwin Booth and farmers Claire and Richard Barber

Two years since Booths developed its Fair Milk scheme, the supermarket has carried out a review on the impact the scheme has had on both farmers and customers.

 

With a pledge to ’pay the highest market price to farmers’, 66 per cent of shoppers said the fair price paid to farmers on Booths milk was their most important consideration on purchase.

 

Research found 93 per cent of shoppers would continue to buy milk which paid a fair price to farmers, even if it meant paying more for milk.

 

Chief executive of Booths, Chris Dee said he was ’gratified, but not surprised by the support of customers for Fair Milk’.

 

He said: "Paying farmers a fair price for milk is as important to us as a business as it is to our customers.

 

Impact

 

"We trade in rural locales and our farmers are often our customers, giving a fair deal is core to our buying ethos.”

 

As research shows the UK now has less than 10,000 dairy farmers, the impact being paid a fair price for milk has had on farmers supplying Booths has been ’staggering’.

 

The fair price paid to farmers has enabled all the farms supplying Booths to make significant capital investments to their farms, improving livestock conditions and working conditions for the farmers.

 

This is in stark contrast to the farming industry as a whole, where recent research by the Prince’s Countryside Fund reported one in five farmers were facing severe financial hardship.

 

Future

 

Claire Barber who farms with her husband Richard near Garstang, Lancashire said being paid a a fair price for their milk has ’saved the farm’.

 

She said: "Being paid a fair price for our milk has enabled us to focus on the welfare of our herd—and their health is completely uncompromised.

 

"We’ve dramatically reduced the use of antibiotics and our milk productivity is at a record high.”

 

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