Farmers Guardian
Topics
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

British Sugar refuses to pay levy refund admin charge

NFU Sugar will pay administration charges so growers receive the money they were owed after being overcharged by EU Commission.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

British Sugar refuses to pay levy refund admin charge

British Sugar has refused to pay administration costs on returning a levy refund to growers, with NFU Sugar committing to paying the £80,000 out of its reserves.

 

Growers of sugar beet during 1999 and 2000 were due a refund on levy payments after a Court of Justice of the European Union ruling confirmed growers were overcharged by the EU Commission.


Read More

A look at the UK sugar beet industry's futureA look at the UK sugar beet industry's future
Development potato herbicide on trialDevelopment potato herbicide on trial
Record yields celebrated as sugar campaign closesRecord yields celebrated as sugar campaign closes
UK will retain beet and cane sugar mix after BrexitUK will retain beet and cane sugar mix after Brexit
Yorkshire sugar beet factory could head to SpainYorkshire sugar beet factory could head to Spain

Growers of sugar beet during 1999 and 2000 were due a refund on levy payments after a Court of Justice of the European Union ruling confirmed growers were overcharged by the EU Commission.

 

Sugar processors in the EU had challenged the over-calculation and more than £6 million was due to be refunded, split between growers and British Sugar.

 

Payments

 

Due to the way the levy was collected, the Rural Payments Agency will make the repayment to British Sugar, who will distribute it to the growers.

 

But this will rack up administration costs of about £80,000 and Farmers Guardian understands British Sugar refused to absorb any of the costs out of its own windfall.

 

British Sugar wanted the grower base to pay the administration costs, meaning farmers would have had to pay to have their own money returned to them.

 

NFU Sugar has committed to covering the full £80,000 costs on behalf of growers from its reserves.

 

As British Sugar did not have the 1999 and 2000 records, it was using its 2001 records, likely to be very similar.

 

Growers will receive a form from British Sugar, or should make contact if they do not receive a form but believe they were entitled to the refund.

 

NFU Sugar

 

Commenting on the ruling, NFU sugar board chairman Michael Sly said the board was working closely with British Sugar to ensure the sugar beet growers get a refund.

 

He urged all growers to contact the dedicated helpline if they did not receive a form.

 

He said: “The clock is ticking and we do not want any grower to miss out.”

British Sugar

A British Sugar Spokesman said:“None of British Sugar’s administration costs are being covered by growers.

 

“As agreed with NFU Sugar we are investing time and resource in ensuring the right money is returned to the right growers, including contacting growers by letter and managing questions and calls.

 

“A considerable amount of work will go into this activity and we have recruited a temporary employee dedicated to the job. NFU Sugar are covering the extra administration costs associated with the growers’ claim.

 

“We are doing everything possible to contact growers – including some who have not grown sugar beet for almost 20 years.

 

“Where information was no longer available, we are using data from more recent years. We have also set up a helpline for growers who have any questions.”

More information

Call the helpline on 01733 422153

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS