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Cathedral City growth offsets butter costs for Dairy Crest

The processor has previously cut promotion for Country Life due to increasing prices for butter.


Alex   Black

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Alex   Black
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Cathedral City growth offsets butter costs for Dairy Crest #teamdairy

Strong brand growth has offset cost inflation for Dairy Crest’s butter business in the first half of the year.

 

While the processor has cut promotional activity for Country Life in response to higher cream prices, strong volume growth for Cathedral City, Clover and Frylight have balanced out reduced sales volumes.

 

While value growth was expected to be ahead of volumes, Cathedral City was expected to deliver double-digit volume growth.

 

Growth

 

Dairy Crest chief executive Mark Allen said: “Cathedral City has had a strong first half of the year, delivering good volume and value growth and strengthening its position as the nation’s favourite cheese.


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“This performance has more than offset the impact of further input cost inflation in the butter business.”

Profits were expected to be ahead of last year, despite input costs remaining high.

 

“The strength of our brands and focus on quality, innovation and efficiencies mean that we remain well positioned to deal with market conditions,” he added.

 

He said the company was continuing to focus on cash generation and reducing net debt which, while currently ahead of March 2017, was expected to fall for the full year.

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