Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

Church of Scotland to appoint dedicated farming minister

RSABI and NFUS have welcomed the announcement of a dedicated farming minister to support the industry through trying times.


Twitter Facebook
Twitter Facebook
Moderator of the general assembly, Rev Dr Angus Morrison
Moderator of the general assembly, Rev Dr Angus Morrison

The Church of Scotland has announced it will be appointing its first ever dedicated ’farming minister’ to help support people in the struggling farming industry.

 

The moderator of the general assembly, Rev Dr Angus Morrison announced the ’innovative and creative’ post during a visit to Ayr Mart this week.

 

Dr Morrison, who grew up in the Highlands, said: "I am delighted to announce the creation of this new ground breaking post to reach out to people in the farming community in Ayrshire.

 

"It is hoped that through this new position the church can meet farmers where they are and build relationships that will allow an understanding of the issues and stresses related to modern day farming.

 

"The Church cares deeply about people in all our communities and I am confident that whoever fills this important role will make a substantial difference to the lives of many people."

 

Do not suffer in silence

 

The announced has been welcomed by the NFU Scotland and RSABI who said the state of the farming sector is taking a serious toll on the health and well being of farmers, many of whom suffer in silence.

 

Union leaders say low produce prices and major problems with Common Agricultural Policy payments were contributing to high levels of stress and mental health issues among farmers, who often feel isolated and cut off from other people.

 

Nina Clancy, chief executive officer of RSABI, said: "I applaud the Church of Scotland for its support of the new rural ministry in Ayr.

 

"The farming industry is facing challenging times and many farming families are struggling.

 

"RSABI is experiencing a substantial increase in the number of people looking for support and financial assistance.

 

"Having someone to talk to is so important because a problem shared is often a problem halved. But unfortunately many in the industry suffer in silence.

 

"I hope that having someone local to talk to in confidence will encourage more people to seek support."

 

New role

 

The pioneer minister, who is expected to have a keen understanding of rural affairs, will visit farms to provide spiritual and family support, counselling and champion the industry, workers’ rights and encourage people to buy local produce.

 

They will also interact with young farmer groups, NFU representatives, visit the weekly livestock mart, annual agriculture shows and draw together groups of people linked to the industry like vets, mart staff and estate workers.

 

The Minister will be based at Craig Wilson Livestock Mart in Ayr, which has agreed to provide office space.

 

 


Read More

Campaign aims to change farming's approach to mental health Campaign aims to change farming's approach to mental health
Farmers urged to address mental health issues Farmers urged to address mental health issues
Getting Started: How New Zealand is taking on mental health Getting Started: How New Zealand is taking on mental health
Mental Health: Rural+ and the help which is available to you Mental Health: Rural+ and the help which is available to you
Time to address industry stigma of mental health Time to address industry stigma of mental health

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS