Farmers Guardian
Topics
How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Councils call for permitted development rights to be scrapped as barn conversions soar

But the CLA said the rules were introduced to allow small villages and rural communities to grow organically and incrementally and were helping tackle housing shortages.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Councils call for permitted development rights to be scrapped as barn conversions soar

Local councils have called for permitted development rights to be scrapped over concerns about rural infrastructure as the number of barn conversions soars.

 

But the CLA defended the Class Q rules and landowners and farmers were contributing to tackling the housing gap.

 

The Local Government Association (LGA) warned rural towns and villages were missing out on vital infrastructure and local services which would be required if developments needed planning persmission due to an almost 230 per cent rise in barns and farm buildings being converted into houses.

 

Figures showed the number of agricultural to residential conversions in England have risen from 226 in 2015/16 to 743 in 2017/18.


Read More

Barn conversions drop 34 per cent as farmers face financial challenge Barn conversions drop 34 per cent as farmers face financial challenge
Corbyn reiterates Labour's policy to compulsory purchase agricultural land to stem housing crisis Corbyn reiterates Labour's policy to compulsory purchase agricultural land to stem housing crisis
The housing debate: What are my retirement options? The housing debate: What are my retirement options?

LGA called on Government to use the Queen’s Speech to commit to scrapping the permitted development rights for all property types.

 

It follows changes in the rules making it possible for agriculture buildings to be converted into up to five new homes, rather than three.

 

Impact

Cllr David Renard, LGA’s planning spokesman said they were concerned about the impact on rural areas.

 

He said councils were committed to building new homes but they needed to be of ‘high quality’ with the right infrastructure in place but the rules were denying them any ‘control or oversight’ and taking away the voice of local residents.

 

“Unless permitted development rules are scrapped, then communities face the risk of substandard housing without any of the vital supporting infrastructure and local services which residents need on a daily basis.”

 

Fenella Collins, Head of Planning at the Country Land and Business Association (CLA) said: “Part of the reason why the rules were introduced were to allow small villages and rural communities to grow organically and incrementally, ensuring the rural housing stock was able to keep up with population changes that have led to a lack of homes in rural areas.

“The ‘Class Q’ conversions – essentially changing farm building to dwellings – are subject to Building Regulations, therefore it’s hard to see how they can be described as ‘sub-standard’.

 

Not exempt

“Furthermore, they are not exempt from the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) which allows local authorities, who choose to implement it, the ability to raise funds from the development for local infrastructure.

 

“Instead of criticising these conversions, we should be pleased that farmers and landowners are contributing to the national effort to bridge the housing gap and that these new homes will help to deliver a prosperous rural economy.

 

“Farm diversification is bringing new employment opportunities to the countryside and people want to live close to their place of work.

 

“These conversions are key to doing so appropriately and sympathetically.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS