Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Crack down on fake pesticides to protect health and environment, says ECPA

The European Crop Protection Association (ECPA) has called on the EU and national Governments to crack down on the production of fake pesticides as they could have an effect on public health, the environment and crop yield.


Abi   Kay

TwitterFacebook
Abi   Kay
TwitterFacebook
Share This

ECPA calls for crackdown on fake pesticides

The push for a clampdown came as a new report from the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUPIO) showed fake pesticides cost EU businesses €1.3 billion every year.

 

In the UK, total lost sales amounted to €76 million, and around 200 jobs were said to be lost as legitimate manufacturers employ fewer people than they would if counterfeiting were not an issue.

 

ECPA director of public affairs Graeme Taylor said: “One thing is the impact this has on our industry in terms of lost revenue. The other, and more concerning element, is the potential impact these counterfeit and illegal products could have on the environment and the health of those using them.

 

“At a time when our industry’s products are rigorously tested and scrutinised, both politically and scientifically, the European Commission and national authorities should be doing more to combat illegal and counterfeit products, rather than arbitrarily reducing the legitimate number of products on the market.”

 

Fake pesticides are either smuggled into the EU or come in under the cover of parallel imports. They enter as active substances, bulk consignments of pre-manufactured concentrate or in fully finished packed goods – in which case, the packaging can come with no user instructions or a copy of the original labelling.


Read More

‘Patronising’ study claims farmers can cut pesticides without losses ‘Patronising’ study claims farmers can cut pesticides without losses
EU policymakers accused of 'disregarding the science' as key pesticides under threat EU policymakers accused of 'disregarding the science' as key pesticides under threat
European farmers lose access to plant protection without UK European farmers lose access to plant protection without UK
MEPs call for ‘low risk’ biological pesticides to be fast-tracked for approval in the EU MEPs call for ‘low risk’ biological pesticides to be fast-tracked for approval in the EU
Pesticides responsible for a health scandal ‘bigger than asbestos’ Pesticides responsible for a health scandal ‘bigger than asbestos’

Advice on avoiding fake pesticides

  • Buy only known and reputable products from known and reputable suppliers (including if buying through the internet).
  • Check the accreditation (eg BASIS) of advisers recommending and/or supplying crop protection products.
  • Always question unrealistic prices – if in doubt ask your supplier where the product came from.
  • Check that the product detailed on the invoice and delivery note matches the product ordered and delivered.
  • Check that packaging is professional, tamper-proof and securely sealed and it has a full label written in English.
  • If you are familiar with the product, ensure the colour and appearance are as expected. A parallel import should look the same as the UK reference product.
  • If you are told that the product “is the same as X’s” and is a parallel import, ask for confirmation that it was made by company X and ask which country it came from (you could ask what the original product was called). Remember that, in order to qualify for a parallel import permit, a product must be: a. authorised for sale and use in the EU country from which it is purchased and, b. identical to one that is already authorised for sale and use in the UK.
  • If you are unsure about the approval status of a pesticide product, check the label for details of the producer, approval holder and official authorisation. Look for it on the CRD database at: secure.pesticides.gov.uk/pestreg/ProdSearch.asp and check the Notice(s) for full details of the product. You could also contact the manufacturer or your adviser for help.
  • Always report suspicious products and suppliers to Defra: 08459 33 55 77.

*Source - UK Crop Protection Association
TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS