Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Dairy industry chiefs condemn Government's 'disappointing' new dairy guidelines

MPs have criticised new Government eating guidelines which recommend cutting dairy intake by half as ‘sorely disappointing’.

Olivia   Midgley

TwitterFacebook
Olivia   Midgley
TwitterFacebook
 Eatwell guidelines ignore the evidence about the health benefits of dairy - MPs
Eatwell guidelines ignore the evidence about the health benefits of dairy - MPs

The Dairy All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG), which earlier this month asked the Government to support the introduction of a national ‘three-a-day’ programme - similar to the popular ‘five-a-day’ recommendation for fruit and vegetables – said the Eatwell guidelines had ignored the evidence about the health benefits of dairy.

 

 

Public Health England’s new Eatwell guidelines recommend dairy products should account for just 8 per cent of an individual’s daily food intake, compared with 15 per cent under the previous guidelines.

 

Dairy APPG chairman Heather Wheeler said: “The Dairy All-Party Parliamentary Group just released a report which highlights the essential role of dairy products in a healthy and balanced diet, based on robust evidence provided by nutrition and health experts.

 

“This evidence is widely available and it is therefore both puzzling and frustrating to see that official dietary guidelines would not rely on it.”

 

The guidelines were also condemned by Arla bosses, who said they were seeking an urgent meeting to clarify ‘what, if any, scientific and nutritional data this new guidance has been based upon’.

 

“Milk is nutritious by nature and having dairy in one’s daily diet is a simple and tasty way to assure intake of important nutrients. Therefore, we are perplexed as to why the new guidance to consumers states that they should lessen their intake,” an Arla spokesman said.

 

He said the company was aware of the wider health issues facing the nation and had focussed on developing new products, for example with lower levels of added sugar, fat, lower salt, increased protein, or boosted vitamins, to increase the range of choice.

 

The spokesman added: “While it is absolutely important that public guidelines are regularly reviewed to meet the changing needs of our population, it is also vital that messages to consumers about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ foods are clear.

 

“There is a very real risk that, as part of a wider dialogue about this new guidance, the value of dairy and the natural, nutritional benefit of milk is forgotten by those who need it most.”

 

“For example, 19 per cent of teenage girls have very low intake of calcium and 22 per cent have very low intake of vitamin B2. Against this backdrop of poor nutrition, we believe that the latest guidance could be misleading, confusing, and will potentially exacerbate an already critical situation.”

 


Read More

AHDB and Dairy UK discussing promotional campaign as milk outlook remains bleak AHDB and Dairy UK discussing promotional campaign as milk outlook remains bleak
Calls for further EU intervention to support struggling dairy farmers Calls for further EU intervention to support struggling dairy farmers
Dairy recovery prospects pushed back as global factors continue to hit market Dairy recovery prospects pushed back as global factors continue to hit market
FUW demands explanation of cuts to dairy in diet FUW demands explanation of cuts to dairy in diet
Making the most of grants available to dairy farmers Making the most of grants available to dairy farmers

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS