Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Defra refuses to be drawn on lifting chlorothalonil ban after Brexit

Defra has refused to be drawn on the possibility of lifting the EU’s chlorothalonil (CTL) ban after Brexit.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Defra refuses to be drawn on lifting CTL ban after Brexit

The Commission proposed the ban after a European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) report highlighted concerns about risks to fish and amphibians and potential contamination of groundwater.

 

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has also classified CTL as a ‘category one’ carcinogen.

 

It is believed the UK joined Hungary, Lithuania and Greece in voting to keep CTL available.

 

But asked by Farmers Guardian whether the Government would seek to overturn the ban after Brexit, a Defra spokesman said: “When we leave the EU, the list of pesticides approved for use in the UK will be carried over into UK law.”


Read More

Chlorothalonil re-approval under threatChlorothalonil re-approval under threat
European Standing Committee votes to ban fungicide chlorothalonilEuropean Standing Committee votes to ban fungicide chlorothalonil

This list of EU-approved pesticides will be kept in place whether the UK leaves with a withdrawal agreement or not.

 

Ministers are already coming under pressure to reverse the EU’s decision.

 

Colin Clark, Scottish Conservative MP for Gordon, contacted Defra immediately to warn the loss of CTL would have a serious impact on growers and the whisky industry.

 

“Having grown barley myself in the wet climate of Scotland, this product was a powerful tool in the arsenal to control fungal disease,” he said.

 

Undermines

 

“This change undermines Scotland’s most iconic crop, malting barley for whisky manufacturing.

 

“It is a result of the EU reacting to lobby groups, ignoring sound science and 50 years of safe use.”

 

The Defra spokesman added: “We recognise the importance of effective pesticides to farms and are committed to making them available where regulators are satisfied and scientific evidence shows they do not pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment.”

 

Advice

 

Any decision about the use of pesticides after Brexit will be based on advice from the independent Expert Committee on Pesticides.

 

A Syngenta spokesman said the company, which sells the chlorothalonil-based product Bravo, was ‘disappointed’ by the ban, which has not been accompanied by an impact assessment.

 

The spokesman also pointed out growers in the UK would be disproportionately affected because of the country’s agronomic conditions.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS