Topics
How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Early spray timing key to wild oat control

Growers often wait until they can see wild oats before applying herbicide, however, by this point the weed is strong and killing it is more challenging, according to Scott Cockburn, Syngenta business manager, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

TwitterFacebook
TwitterFacebook

“If you can control wild oats at an earlier timing you can get more active ingredient on the oat to do the job and it is not shielded by the wheat or barley crop you are trying to protect.”


Read More

CropTec Show: Black-grass woes boost soya production CropTec Show: Black-grass woes boost soya production
Mild winter hampering grass-weed control Mild winter hampering grass-weed control
Survey highlights growers’ black-grass tactics Survey highlights growers’ black-grass tactics

Syngenta eastern counties application specialist Harry Fordham says there is a wide application window for treatment with Axial Pro (pinoxaden), which could present a range of scenarios for differing weed and crop sizes in spring. Small grass weeds can also be difficult targets to hit and retain spray on the leaf, he says.

 

Trials

 

Research and application trials at Syngenta innovation sites have identified three key factors to get right with wild oat control: timing, application and product formulation.

 

Mr Fordham says the product can be used from growth stage 11 (first leaf unfolded), through to GS39 (flag leaf emerged).

Application

 

“At the early spring application timing, both the crop and the weeds are typically still small and the target is exposed and easy to hit,” he says. “However, there is a chance not all the spring seeds will have germinated and later weeds could still emerge.

 

“If application is delayed and the crop goes into stem extension, the wild oats can be shielded by the larger crop and become more difficult to target with spray droplets.

“Where treatment is left until the crop is at flag leaf, the larger target wild oats are again easier to hit, but they could have already seriously impacted on yield.”

 

Herbicide application rates should always be tailored to the largest weeds in the crop, he adds.

For the early treatments, Mr Fordham advises the best application tips are to use the angled Syngenta 3D nozzle with a water volume of 100 litres per hectare. However, as the crop gets larger, he suggests switching to an Amistar nozzle, again applying 100 litres/ha water volume, can better target weeds in the canopy.


Key points

  • Controlling wild oats at an earlier timing helps prevent them being shielded by the crop
  • At the early spring application timing, both crop and weeds are typically still small and the target is exposed and easy to hit
  • For example, Axial Pro (pinoxaden) can be used from GS11 to G39
  • For early treatments use angled 3D nozzle
  • As crop gets larger, switching to an Amistar nozzle can better target weeds in the canopy
TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent