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EFSA publishes ED identification guidance

EFSA and the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) have published guidance on how to identify substances with endocrine disrupting (ED) properties in pesticides.


Marianne   Curtis

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Marianne   Curtis
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The European Commission tasked EFSA and ECHA with developing harmonised guidance to ensure that the endocrine disruptor criteria adopted by the EU in 2017 are applied consistently for the assessment of pesticides in the EU. The guidance was drafted with the support of the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission’s science and knowledge service.

 

The guidance will be used for the assessment of active substances for which a decision is scheduled on or after November 10, 2018.

Guidance for the identification of endocrine disruptors in the context of Regulations (EU) No 528/2012 and (EC) No 1107/2009

 

Hazel Doonan, AIC head of crop protection and agronomy sector said the guidance will be used to help in assessment of products as they come up for renewal or first approval and that until the process gets underway, it is difficult to predict which products will be affected. “Even if manufacturers may know they may lose a product they are unlikely to say as they will not want to tell competitors or influence the assessors.”

 

A Crop Protection Association (CPA) spokesperson said: “We anticipate that the likely proportion of substances impacted will be substantially greater than that estimated in the Commission’s impact assessment published in 2016 when evaluating the policy options for the criteria.

 

“Overall, we believe the document will not facilitate consistency in regulatory decision making and will not allow assessors to arrive at clear binary decisions as to whether or not the ED criteria are met based on currently available information.

 

“We are also concerned that the guidance will lead to significant increases in unnecessary laboratory animal testing which is clearly contrary to the obligations laid down in the Animal Testing Directive (2010/63) and Regulation 1107/2009.”

 


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