Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

Environmental and economic case for growing miscanthus put forward at agri-renewables event

A growing demand for renewable energy crops and the environmental benefits associated with miscanthus has improved its viability as a commercial crop according to speakers at the agri-renewables event.



Twitter Facebook
Twitter Facebook
Share This

Miscanthus offers economic and environmental benefits #renewableenergy #arable

The verdict of 200 global leaders agreeing in Paris that the reduction of carbon emissions is crucial in tackling the rise in global temperatures, is good news for the renewable energy industry.

 

Since miscanthus cropping area makes up 6 percent of the area grown for renewable energy, it is a key contributor to lowering carbon emissions.

 

Not only that, but recent academic research has suggested, there are a number of environmental benefits of putting 5 per cent of UK lower grade land into miscanthus production.

 

Speaking at the agri-renewables event, George Robinson, managing director of Terravesta said: “Miscanthus requires minimum inputs and typically delivers high annual yields, currently delivering 12- 18 tonnes per hectare from well-established crops.”

 

Given the volatility in cereal prices and the need to maximise returns from arable land, miscanthus could prove a viable solution for many farmers, particularly those farming lower grade land.

 

Mr Robinson said: “As well as the environmental benefits attributed to growing miscanthus, there’s a good financial case for it, and it can help boost food production on farm.

 

“Growing this perennial energy crop offers greater security of high annual net margin than almost any other crop, while reducing working capital and overhead costs.”

 

See also: Farmers urged to consider straw for renewable energy

 

 


Read More

Family embraces renewable technology to secure farm's future Family embraces renewable technology to secure farm's future
Government's renewable energy subsidy cuts are a heavy blow to sector Government's renewable energy subsidy cuts are a heavy blow to sector
Oil price slump should not affect clean energy investment Oil price slump should not affect clean energy investment
Soil Association calls for clamp down in use of maize for renewable energy Soil Association calls for clamp down in use of maize for renewable energy
UK will fail to achieve 2020 energy targets without policy improvements UK will fail to achieve 2020 energy targets without policy improvements

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS