Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

Farm deaths prompt health and safety warning

Farmers have been urged to stay safe on farms this Christmas after two men died in a slurry pit tragedy last week.


Twitter Facebook
Twitter Facebook
Three members of the Spence family died after being overcome by slurry gases at a farm in 2012
Three members of the Spence family died after being overcome by slurry gases at a farm in 2012

Two farm workers, named locally as Richard Pooley, 36, and Alexander Forman, 32, lost their lives after they were overcome by fumes in a slurry pit at Sunk Island, East Yorkshire.

 

The incident is the latest slurry pit horror to rock the farming community after three members of the Spence family died after being overcome by slurry gases at a farm in Northern Ireland in September 2012.

 

Farm safety and transport adviser at the NFU, Tom Price, urged farmers to be wary of workplace dangers.

 

He said: “The recent tragic events highlight the need for everyone on farm to be constantly vigilant and aware of the potential risks when working around slurry pits and from slurry gas.

 

“The NFU, as part of the Farm Safety Partnership, has identified slurry pits and slurry gas as one of the significant risks facing those working in the industry. We are campaigning to raise awareness and adherence to best practice when working around slurry pits to help prevent accidents."

 

According to the Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSE NI), slurry gas is a mixture of gasses including methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia and hydrogen sulphide.

 

The most dangerous of these is hydrogen sulphide as it is extremely poisonous to people and animals. A high concentration removes your sense of smell, causing difficulty in breathing, often resulting in death from only a few breaths.

 

The latest figures from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) show 33 farm workers and four members of the public were killed on Britain’s farms during 2014-15.

 

Mr Price continued: “For many people Christmas and New Year are holidays. However, many farmers will carry on working and accidents can happen.

 

“We urge all those working in farming to be aware of the risks faced when working with livestock, machinery, at height and around slurry pits.

 

“Also at this time of year when weather and light conditions can be poor we urge farmers and their workers to take care when working alone and that others know where they are working and when they will report back.”

 


Read More

Elderly farm worker killed in combine harvester tragedy Elderly farm worker killed in combine harvester tragedy
Farm fatalities fall but health and safety stigma must be addressed Farm fatalities fall but health and safety stigma must be addressed
Farmers urged to watch working hours of staff this harvest Farmers urged to watch working hours of staff this harvest
'Gone too soon' - tributes pour in for much-loved farmer after tragic accident 'Gone too soon' - tributes pour in for much-loved farmer after tragic accident
'It has left a massive hole in all our lives' - farmer died after being trapped under large silage bale 'It has left a massive hole in all our lives' - farmer died after being trapped under large silage bale


Agricultural fatalities over the last five years

In the last five years, 160 farm workers have lost their lives:

 

  • 30 struck by a moving vehicle
  • 23 fell from height
  • 23 injured by an animal
  • 16 came into contact with machinery
  • 26 struck by an object
  • 42 fatalities through other means


Source: HSE

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS