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Farmer, 82, bitten on face by dog after trying to protect sheep

An elderly farmer was bitten on the face by a dog he was attempting to save his sheep from.



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Farmer, 82, bitten on face by dog after trying to protect sheep #TakeTheLead

The attack happened at 6.30pm on Monday, October 9 at Lower Misbourne Farm in Sussex.

 

The 82-year-old farmer caught a dog attacking one of his sheep and tried to intervene.

 

He sustained a severe facial wound, which required hospital treatment, after being attacked by a second dog.

 

Both dogs are described as being completely black, and similar in build to a Labrador or a Collie, with fluffy tails.


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The dogs are believed to have been together, though neither was wearing a collar or tags. There was no sign of an owner nearby.

 

Sergeant Gareth Jackson, of the Surrey and Sussex Police Dog Unit, said: “Unfortunately sheep worrying is an ongoing issue, and it’s important to realise that it is an offence.

 

 

“Pet owners need to be aware that if their dogs are out of control, or seen attacking or worrying livestock, then the farmer has the right to shoot the dog under the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953.”

 

"If you can help us identify these dogs, or have any information about the incident, please report it online or call 101 quoting serial 1229 of 09/10."

Getting our Take the Lead signs

Getting our Take the Lead signs

We have 1,000s of livestock worrying signs which you can nail to gateposts or fenceposts near footpaths to highlight the problem to walkers.

 

If you would like some of these signs, please send a stamped, self-addressed A4 envelope to:

 

FG Take the Lead, Farmers Guardian,

Unit 4, Fulwood Business Park,

Preston, Lancashire,

PR2 9NZ.

 

You will need at least three First Class or Second Class stamps on to cover postage costs. We will be able send up to 25 signs.

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