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Farmer dies after falling from ladder while fixing roof

A farmer has died after falling off a ladder while he was repairing a roof on the family farm.

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Farmer dies after falling from ladder while fixing roof #FarmSafety

The 52-year-old man was pronounced dead at the scene in Kilmacthomas, Co Waterford.

 

The incident happened at Scrahan, Kilmacthomas on Monday, November 5.

 

The Health and Safety Authority’s Senior Inspector Pat Griffin said: "The fatal accident is currently under investigation. This is particularly sad considering we had a fall from height campaign last month.

 

“Most falls from height are fatal, it’s not worth taking a risk.

 

“We are asking farmers to plan ahead and make sure that work at height is only carried out using the proper equipment and with protective measures in place.

 

"This can be done by carrying out a risk assessment that identifies all of the hazards especially when working to repair fragile roofs.”

 

 


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The incident comes days after a 71-year-old man was killed after being hit by a Manitou telehandler on a farm in Richmondshire.

 

Meanwhile, farm safety leaders have called for an urgent rethink into the way farmers aged 60 and over consider safe working.


The impact of the eldering workforce was last week highlighted as the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) revealed that despite making up just 10 per cent of the national workforce, the 60+ age group contributed to more than 40 per cent of work-related fatalities in 2017/18 – the highest it had been in over a decade and up from 25 per cent last year.

 

Of the 144 workers killed in 2017/18, 29 were in the agricultural sector – one more than the five-year annual average and 14 of which were over the age of 65.

 

Stephanie Berkeley of the Farm Safety Foundation, a small independent charity established to target Young Farmers of 16 to 40 years, said work with the younger generation had shown that behavioural change was possible and ‘the physical and mental well-being of our wonderful farmers merits an ongoing focus and real action’.

 

 

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