Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Farmers boost yellowhammer numbers by 78 per cent, new study shows

Farmers taking part in a Northern Irish agri-environment scheme helped to boost yellowhammer numbers by 78 per cent between 2006 and 2011, according to a new RSBP study.


Abi   Kay

TwitterFacebook
Abi   Kay
TwitterFacebook
Share This

Farmers boost yellowhammer numbers by 78 per cent in County Down

The increase in the yellowhammer population – a red-listed species of high conservation concern – was described as ‘impressive’ by the RSPB.

 

The charity’s research also found house sparrow and tree sparrow numbers grew by 46 per cent and 207 per cent respectively on farms taking part in the Environmental Farming Scheme (EFS) across east County Down.

 

RSPB Northern Ireland is now encouraging farmers to sign up for the scheme, which compensates landowners for providing winter feed crop for wild birds, retaining winter stubble, creating arable margins and establishing pollinator margins.


Read More

‘They are learning a lot’ – Hopes raised of Defra culture shift as new scheme launched ‘They are learning a lot’ – Hopes raised of Defra culture shift as new scheme launched
Agri-environment schemes more than double farmland bird numbers Agri-environment schemes more than double farmland bird numbers
NFU hits back at claims neonics are poisoning farmland birds NFU hits back at claims neonics are poisoning farmland birds

Kendrew Colhoun, senior conservation scientist at the RSPB, said: “We see the EFS as a critical component as part of our work to maintain biodiversity across the countryside in Northern Ireland.

 

“Our study provides unequivocal evidence that agri-environment schemes can deliver for key species if the correct mix of EFS options – such as ones to provide summer and winter food and nesting habitat – are targeted to the right places and coupled with advice.”

 

The study was the first of its kind to be carried out on the island of Ireland and included face-to-face advisory work.

Farmer Jack Kelly, from just outside Downpatrick, has employed a range of options on his land including wild bird cover, overwintering stubbles, rough grass margins and native hedging.

 

He said: “The agri-environmental scheme has been beneficial for us, providing the opportunity to help wildlife on areas of our land which may not be as productive as other areas.

 

“We were able to utilise field margins or awkward corners and turn them into havens for wildlife. The overwintered stubbles and wild bird cover plot provides my family and me with a great spectacle over the winter when hundreds of birds come to feed on the seed.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS