Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Farmers should not be paid to provide healthy soil, says no-till champion

A renowned no-till champion has said farmers should not be paid to provide healthy soil as part of a public goods system of support.  

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Farmers should not be paid to provide healthy soil, says no-till champion

John Cherry, who farms in Hertfordshire and is director of Groundswell, an event which focuses on soil regeneration, made the comments at the East of England farming conference yesterday (November 1).

 

Responding to a question from Farmers Guardian about how soil health should be defined in order to allow farmers to be paid for providing it, he said: “I hate subsidies and I do not think farmers should be paid for soil health, because it is in their interests. Just do it for your own benefit.

 

“It is terribly distorting to be paid to do something, it always has unforeseen consequences.


Read More

Anger over Government refusal to pay farmers to improve soil health post-BrexitAnger over Government refusal to pay farmers to improve soil health post-Brexit
Cover crops needed to maximise benefits of no-tillCover crops needed to maximise benefits of no-till
Digging deep to improve soil healthDigging deep to improve soil health
Groundswell: Savings to be had with no-till farmingGroundswell: Savings to be had with no-till farming
New agricultural policy could include national recovery plan to improve soil healthNew agricultural policy could include national recovery plan to improve soil health

“It is also very hard to say what soil health is, but I suppose if the soil is healthy enough to grow a crop which does not need spraying or fertilising and still yields incredibly well, it is very healthy soil.

 

“That should be good enough for you as a farmer. You are making money for low inputs, Happy Christmas.”

 

Brian Barker, an AHDB strategic farmer from mid-Suffolk, who was also on the conference panel, agreed with Mr Cherry’s sentiments.

 

He raised further concerns about how different soils could be judged equally in any future scheme.

But Patrick Holden, chief executive of the Sustainable Food Trust, said he believed it would be possible to use soil organic matter as a proxy for soil health.

 

“Different soils will carry different levels of soil carbon, and that has to be factored in, but surely if you are building soil carbon and you get rewarded for that as part of emission reduction targets, there is nothing wrong with paying farmers to be soil carbon stewards,” he added.

 

“That would shift the balance of profitability towards mixed farming.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS