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Farmers to use leaky dams and hedges as flood prevention

Farmers in the Denbighshire hills are set to use leaky log damns and hedge-planting in a bid to help protect the Vale of Clwyd from flooding.

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Farmers to use leaky dams and hedges as flood prevention

The project, being pioneered by rural development agency Cadwyn Clwyd, has seen farmers team up to reduce the flow of rainwater and prevent surges from entering into the Clwyd.

 

They do so by planting new and restoring old hedges, creating small woodlands, shelter belts and streamside corridors and the use of ‘leaky log’ dams on hillside streams.

 

About £660,000 will be put into the scheme to reduce the likelihood of events similar to the 2001 and 2012 local floods, where both the River Clwyd, Ruthin, and the River Elwy, St Asaph, overflowed from torrential rain.

 

The funding will be split equally between the two areas.


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Cadwyn Clwyd’s Gwyn Rowlands said the money was granted under the Welsh Government’s Sustainable Management Scheme and follows an initial approach made by local NFU group vice-chairman Dafydd Jones, of Pencoed, Pwllglas, on behalf of its members.

 

Mr Rowlands urged farmers to get involved, not only to help towards the natural flood defence, but also to gain ‘invaluable’ benefits from hedgerows and woodlands which he said would provide shelter for livestock, aid livestock management and reduce soil erosion.

 

He said: “The Pontbren project research report 2013 suggests woodlands and hedges can increase soil infiltration rates by more than 60 times when compared to pastureland.

 

“Leaky log dams have the same effect, slowing the rate of flow so a great mass of water does not arrive downstream all at once.”

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