Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

‘Farming is often a solitary profession’ - rural mental health bumped to top of agenda

Stigma surrounding mental health has this month been bumped to the top of the agenda.



Twitter Facebook
Twitter Facebook
60 per cent of people said they would be happy to talk to family or friends.
60 per cent of people said they would be happy to talk to family or friends.
Share This

Rural mental health bumped to top of agenda #itsoktosay

Farming officials championed the work of Support in Mind Scotland and Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) who for the first time encouraged farmers and crofters to speak up about life with a mental illness in a recent survey.

 

It came as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge William and Kate, alongside brother Prince Harry, boosted the public profile of mental health with the launch of their Heads Together campaign last week.

 

A joint statement from the trio said attitudes to mental health were ‘at a tipping point’.


Read More

‘Talking and connecting’ key to tackling mental health in rural areas ‘Talking and connecting’ key to tackling mental health in rural areas
'Are Ewe Okay?' - Scottish Young Farmers launch mental health campaign 'Are Ewe Okay?' - Scottish Young Farmers launch mental health campaign
Campaign aims to change farming's approach to mental health Campaign aims to change farming's approach to mental health
Farmers encouraged 'You Are Not Alone' in mental health illnesses Farmers encouraged 'You Are Not Alone' in mental health illnesses
Getting Started: How New Zealand is taking on mental health Getting Started: How New Zealand is taking on mental health

YouGov statistics

  • One in four Scots suffer mental ill health at least once in their lives
  • 46 per cent of all Britons opened up about mental health issues within the last three months
  • 60 per cent of people said they would be happy to speak to family or friends

 

Ceredigion beef and sheep farmer Helen Howells, 33, backed the campaign and said it gave hope to ‘many of us who feel uncomfortable talking about this kind of thing’.

 

She said: “Farming is often a solitary profession, which reinforces the importance of marts, vets’ surgeries, agricultural merchants and local shows as key social hubs for farmers.

 

“These are ‘spaces’ where issues of concern are aired and shared and where we can begin to normalise mental health conversations.

 

Exposure

“It is about time to break the stigma attached to mental health and if you are feeling vulnerable, please open-up and speak to someone.”

 

NFU Scotland president Andrew McCornick echoed the claims and said he was pleased studies were ‘finally beginning’ to expose the impacts of modern day farming and rural living.

 

“The survey results must act as a platform to tackle the stigma that still exists around mental health in a traditional industry like farming,” he said.

 

“There is clearly much more that must be done to talk frankly and openly about these issues in farming and crofting circles, while at the same time raising awareness of the organisations that are there to help.”

 

It came as Support in Mind Scotland promised to ‘connect’ people in rural communities in answer to their affirmation that ordinary links in the community helped overcome stigma, isolation and remoteness.

 

Jim Hume, manager of the forum for Support in Mind Scotland, added: “Mental ill health can be more difficult to tackle in remoter parts of Scotland but it can be treated, especially with early intervention.

 

“The Forum and its members are keen to take action by raising awareness in rural communities and normalising talking about mental ill health.”

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS