Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Genetic clues of tuberculosis spread between cows and badgers revealed

Tuberculosis in cattle and badgers passes between members of the same species at least twice as often than between cow and badger, a study has found.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Genetic clues of tuberculosis spread between cows and badgers revealed

Researchers analysing genetic data from the bacteria that causes the disease also found that cattle are approximately 10 times more likely to catch TB from badgers than badgers are to catch it from cattle.

 

Using data collected over a 15-year period from an undisturbed population of badgers in Woodchester Park,

 

Gloucestershire and nearby farms, the study provides the first direct evidence of transmission between badgers and cattle.

 

The researchers analysed the entire genetic make-up of the bacteria from 230 badgers and 189 cattle, a process known as whole genome sequencing.

 

This was combined with information on where the cattle and badgers lived, when they were infected, and whether they could have had contact with one another.


Read More

Owen Paterson: 'It is a tragedy we have thrown away our bTB success'Owen Paterson: 'It is a tragedy we have thrown away our bTB success'
Roger Evans: 'It was bit of a surprise, but we actually passed our latest TB test'Roger Evans: 'It was bit of a surprise, but we actually passed our latest TB test'

The work was led by experts from the University of Edinburgh, with collaborators from institutions including the Animal and Plant Health Agency, the University of Glasgow and University College Dublin.

 

Rowland Kao, Professor of Veterinary Epidemiology and Data Science at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Current approaches to controlling bovine tuberculosis only discriminate at a very coarse, regional level between areas where badgers are more likely to be involved in infecting cattle from areas where they are not.

 

"This work identifies genetic signatures that could guide the interpretation of similar data if collected in other, less-intensively studied areas.

 

“This would allow for a more targeted control of tuberculosis in cattle and badgers, aiding efforts to control the disease and reduce the impact on the badger population.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS