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Get help with spraying grassland

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It costs just £5.50/acre for a contractor to spray perennial weeds, such as docks, thistles or ragwort, in grass fields. With significant benefits to livestock enterprises, it pays to get qualified help.

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Less than 10 per cent of grassland in the UK is sprayed with a selective herbicide each year. Many of these fields are treated only once every three to four years, so it is not surprising some livestock farmers are unwilling to invest in their own sprayer, take the necessary training or have their sprayers tested every three years.

 

Controlling weeds in grassland can deliver significant benefits for livestock enterprises, so it may pay to take on a contractor to spray fields.

 

Employing a contractor

 

There are good reasons to employ a local contractor:

  • Fully qualified with City and Guilds PA1, PA2 (horizontal boom sprayers) and PA6 (handheld applicators) certification
  • Experienced at spraying grassland and good local knowledge
  • Fully insured
  • Appropriate, modern and well calibrated machinery, for example, air inclusion nozzles allowing good coverage of weeds with less spray drift
  • While the contractor sprays, other jobs can be done
  • In some cases, contractors can supply product, so no need for product storage
  • Contractor may take empty containers away

Read More

Correct spraying gives best control Correct spraying gives best control
More grass with fewer weeds More grass with fewer weeds
Use herbicides with confidence Use herbicides with confidence

Be certified to spot treat

 

Almost all farmers will want to use a knapsack sprayer to tidy up around the farm with glyphosate, or Grazon®Pro, as a spot treatment on docks, thistles or nettles in grass fields.

 

To apply these products, farmers must hold an appropriate certificate.

 

People born before December 31, 1964, can complete a quicker and cheaper route to qualification by taking the Level 2 Award ‘Safe Use of Pesticides Replacing Grandfather Rights’. But this comes to an end on December 31, 2018.

 

After this date, they will have to take the full set of qualifications from the PA suite of certificates, so it is worth doing this year.

 

Sponsored Article

Work together

Work together

 

Working with a local contractor is a very good way of getting jobs done on livestock farms, where spraying for weeds will never make it to the top of the ‘to-do’ list.

 

It is critical to use a skilled, professional contractor who is properly insured. The wrong contractor will cost money, time and hassle. Choose a contractor based on expertise and reputation, rather than just price.

 

Clearly communicate with the contractor at all times. Tell him about your land, the footpaths, watercourses and other environmental risks.

 

Warn him about safety issues, such as hidden obstacles, overhead power-lines or dangerous terrain. Decide who is buying the herbicide and how the containers will be disposed of before the contractor arrives.

 

You can find fully qualified, professional contractors in your area on our website, or via the Dow Grassland app.

Use plant protection products safely. Always read the label and product information before use. For further information including warning phrases and symbols refer to the label. Corteva. Agriculture division of DowDuPont. CPC2 Capital Park, Fulbourn, Cambridge CB21 5XE. Tel: +44 (0)1462 457272 Grazon®Pro contains clopyralid and triclopyr. For grassland advice, call the technical hotline on 0800 689 8899, or visit www.grassbites.co.uk

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