Farmers Guardian
Topics
How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Getting the most from silage cuts in a wet spring

Maximising second and third cut yields needs particular attention this season, following first cut harvesting delays and poorer yields on the back of the wet spring.


Hannah   Park

TwitterFacebook
Hannah   Park
TwitterFacebook

With forage supplies tight and bought-in feeds expensive due to high straw prices, farmers need to be producing their own quality forage according to Graham Ragg, Senior Agronomist at Mole Valley Farmers.

 

He said: “The delays to first cut harvest are a big problem, as it usually provides the biggest and best quality yield.

 

“First cut should still be taken as soon as possible to encourage quality re-growth, alongside strategic use of fertiliser to get the best possible silage yields.

 

“In a ‘normal’ year, producers generally choose to reduce the acreage harvested after first cut has been taken, but this year, grazing more intensively after it has been harvested will maximise second and third cut acerage.”

 


Read More

A closer look at clamping kit designed to improve silage A closer look at clamping kit designed to improve silage

Graham explained that two per cent per day in second cut yields is lost for every day fertiliser application is delayed after harvesting first cut.

 

He added that choosing the right after cut fertiliser is also important. “For second cut, about 75 units per acre of nitrogen (90kgs/hectare) is optimum,” said Mr Ragg.

 

“Potash is also key due to the fact every one tonne of silage taken off will remove 10 units of potash per acre (12kgs/hectare).

 

“Including sulphur in any bagged product is also recommendable, considering it can lead to a 30 per cent uplift in grass yields.”

 

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS