Farmers Guardian
Topics
How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Global ag view: US farmers face millions of dollars of damage

Farmers in North and South Carolina face huge losses of livestock and crops after Hurricane Florence.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

Global ag view: US farmers face millions of dollars of damage

Millions of farm animals have died and millions of dollars of damage has been caused to crops in North and South Carolina from Hurricane Florence.

 

The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs reported preliminary estimates of 3.4m poultry birds and 5,500 pigs having died as a result of the storm.

 

Unprecedented

 

Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler said: “This was an unprecedented storm with flooding expected to exceed that from any other storms in recent memory.


Read More

Global ag view: Africa important market to UK farmersGlobal ag view: Africa important market to UK farmers
Global Ag View: Argentina to increase its global presenceGlobal Ag View: Argentina to increase its global presence
Global Ag View: Brexit opens door for exports to ArgentinaGlobal Ag View: Brexit opens door for exports to Argentina
Global ag view: Irish farmers stage protest as beef buyers 'run amok'Global ag view: Irish farmers stage protest as beef buyers 'run amok'
Global ag view: Strong European lamb tradeGlobal ag view: Strong European lamb trade

“We know agricultural losses will be significant because the flooding has affected the top six agricultural counties in our state.

 

“The footprint of flooding from this storm covers much of the same area hit by flooding from Hurricane Matthew in 2016, which only worsens the burden on these farmers.”

 

In South Carolina, the direct loss to farmers was expected to be $125m (£94.7m), with cotton crops hit hard. There would also be impacts on soybeans, peanuts, fruits, vegetables and livestock.

 

South Carolina Farm Bureau president Harry Ott said farmers in the state were ‘no strangers’ to hurricanes, flooding and national disasters.

 

Impact

 

“Hurricane Florence significantly impacted the Pee Dee region where the majority of our state’s crops are grown. We are working with our farmers and officials to get everyone back on their feet as quickly as possible.”

 

Cullen Bryant, who farms 650 hectares in Dillon County, South Carolina, estimated up to 80 per cent of his 300-hectare cotton crop was lost and said there was not much he could have done to protect the crop in the field.

 

“We knew we would get rain, just not the rainfall that we did," he said.

 

"In some ways, we feel like we dodged a bullet since it did not come in right on top of us. That was a blessing in and of itself.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS