Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Gloucester calf named ‘Sinky’ after being stuck in hole for nine days

A calf that was thought to be dead was found nine days later with his head poking out of a sink hole.


Lauren   Dean

TwitterFacebook
Lauren   Dean
TwitterFacebook
Sinky the Gloucester calf
Sinky the Gloucester calf

 

Gloucestershire cheese maker Jonathan Crump noticed the calf was missing on September 2 after its mother returned with milk.

 

Nine days later he was ’amazed’ to learn it had been found by two passers-by in a 3 ft deep hole.

 

“I only milk 15 Gloucester cows so I noticed it was missing when its mother had milk, which could mean her calf is either ill or has disappeared," Mr Crump said.

 

“The next couple of days I searched high and low.

 

“We are surrounded by woodland so I presumed a badger or a fox had eaten it and it had fallen into the stream.

“If its mother had stood mooing next to the hole I probably would have found it straight away”

“I wondered why we hadn’t found the remains.”

 

After nine days two walkers who were lost off their path stumbled across the calf with its head sticking out of the ground. They helped lift it out of the hole and reunited it with its mother.

 

Aloof mother

Mr Crump said the mother of the calf was an ‘aloof mother’ who went off with the rest of the heard.

 

“If it had stood next to the hole mooing I probably would’ve found the calf straight away. It was quite weak when it came out.”

 

As a reward for the calf, Mr Crump gave the walkers some of his homemade cheese.

 

“I gave them some cheese and they said it was the best cheese they had ever had.

 

“They were very happy and I was very happy because another day and the calf would have been dead.”

 

Although the calf was stronger than a newly born calf, Mr Crump said he was ‘amazed’ it had survived. He said the bad weather and a 'few wet days' were partly to thank.

 

“I expect the calf would have sucked moisture off the grass for a day or two and nibbled the grass around its head,” he said.

 

Sinky has since been fed electrolytes to combat his dehydration but is said to be making a great recovery.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS