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Grassland UK 2015: Logistics options fire imagination

Whether it is a strive to be more efficient, keeping mud off roads, or generally just working that bit safer, Grassland UK event certainly provided some food for thought when it comes to transport solutions. James Rickard and Geoff Ashcroft report. Pictures by Marcello Garbagnoli.

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JW Fabrications crop transfer system

JW Fabrications crop transfer system

Looking for a solution to keep mud off the road for its biomass and AD harvesting business, Hertfordshire contractor Eastern Counties Straw has developed a crop transfer system for grass, whole crop and maize.

 

Using a bulk hopper and conveyor with its own 90hp engine and hydraulic system, the trailed implement can be positioned in-field, allowing field trailers to transfer crop to road trailers.

 

Trailer drivers have their own remote control to operate the crop transfer system, allowing crop to be tipped into the machine and transferred into waiting lorries.

 

It is a process that keeps tractors and trailers working in the field, reducing the risk of mud being taken onto roads. Capable of transferring two 14 tonne silage trailer loads into a 30-tonne artic trailer in about eight minutes, the crop transfer system costs £85,000.

K Two push trailer

K Two push trailer

Buckinghamshire trailer firm K Two has developed a range of ejector trailers for silage crops, aimed at boosting crop handling logistics. Called Roadeo Compact and Push (pictured), there are three models offering 16, 18 and 20 tonne capacities.

 

The no-tip trailers are said to be capable of carrying up to 40 per cent more material than an equivalent tipping trailer. All models use a sliding headboard mounted on top of a sliding floor section, to achieve either crop compression or crop ejection, defined by sensors mounted on the rear door.

 

Roadeo Compact and Push models are priced from £30,000.

 

The firm has also developed the rodeo Curve trailer range offering, as its name suggests, a curved body profile to improve tipping performance when handling stickier materials.

 

A single, vertical lift tipping ram is a feature of this new range, requiring less hydraulic flow and pressure, making the body easier to tip and quicker to lower, says the firm.

 

K Two’s Roadeo Curve series is priced from £15,000.

Stains Trailers’ bale trailer

Stains Trailers’ bale trailer

Designed to avoid time wasted spent strapping a load on, Stains Trailer showed off a novel solution to securing bales on a trailer by developing a trailer with hydraulic folding sides.

 

Available in lengths from 24-36 feet, the trailer incorporates sides which lift up and down in parallel via hydraulics. Via two of the tractor’s hydraulic services, each side can be lifted independently, and the trailer can be moved around the field with the sides down.

 

The trailer, suitable for round or square bales, is fitted with high speed commercial axles as standard and there is various tyre options.

 

Retail prices start from £16,142.

Hi-Spec Kompactor trailer

Hi-Spec Kompactor trailer

At the event, Hi-Spec Engineering launched a new addition to its product range – the Kompactor dual-purpose push-off and compacting trailer.

 

Via a three-stage hydraulic ram, it features a moving headboard which can be used to compact material such as grass or maize silage by up to 80 per cent, says the manufacturer, or for emptying can completely empty the trailer in as little as 30 seconds.

 

A key highlight is that apart from being ideal for use in low buildings, the Kompactor also avoids the inherent risks associated with tipping trailers, such as striking power lines or instability on soft or uneven ground.

 

The Kompactor is available in four sizes and there is also a demount version, allowing the trailer body to be swapped for a vacuum tanker body.

 

Retail prices start from £36,500.

Claas Cargos 8000 Series forage wagon

Claas Cargos 8000 Series forage wagon

Designed as a dual purpose machine, the new range of Claas Cargos 8000 Series forage wagons features a pick-up and chopping unit which can be removed, turning the loader wagon into a trailer.

 

To turn into a trailer, pick-up and chopping unit can be removed in about 15 minutes and a blanking plate fitted.

 

Said to be suited to our heavy grassland conditions, the new, three-model series comprises the 8300, 8400 and 8500 which have capacities of 30, 35.5 and 41cu.m (actual volume) respectively.

 

From the pick-up, the crop is fed through an 860mm diameter rotor fitted with nine rows of tines in a helical pattern, which are bolted on for ease of maintenance and replacement if necessary.

 

Also, the front portion of the floor lowers, so that a user can stand up underneath the wagon to carry out maintenance on the knife bank.

Richard Western trailer updates

Richard Western trailer updates

With a whole host of updates aimed at improving reliability, longevity and user-friendliness, it looks like the engineers at Richard Western have been busy fettling their monocoque trailer design.

 

One obvious update is the move to plastic mudguards. As well as making manufacturing simpler and not having to use nearly 40 different metal mudguard patterns for each trailer model, the firm says the new mudguards protect the underside of the trailer better and are more resistant to possible damage.

 

Structurally, the trailers now feature a triangular shape box section along the bottom edge of the trailers where the floor and sides meet, rather than just welding the two elements together at an angle.

 

Suspension units have also been beefed up to increase longevity with the use of thicker pins, metalastic bushes and improved spring support.

 

Load sensing hydraulic brakes, which can automatically alter braking aggressiveness depending on load, are now standard.

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