Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2018

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

Growing concern over impact of neonicotinoids on wildlife

A new study reviewed by Buglife has shown neonictinoids are being spread through air and water and causing concern for a great range of wildlife.


Twitter Facebook
Twitter Facebook
Studies showed honeybees were collecting enough of the pesticide to damage hive productivity
Studies showed honeybees were collecting enough of the pesticide to damage hive productivity

An environmental group claims a new study shows neonicotinoids are being widely spread through the air and water, into hedgerows, meadows, rivers and ponds where they can damage a range of wildlife.

 

Buglife said the report by Scientists at the University of Sussex ’heightened the concern’ about the scale of environmental harm caused by neonicotinoids.

 

Studies show honeybees are collecting enough of the toxin to damage the productivity and reproduction rate of the hive, while many other caterpillars and bugs living close to arable fields are also exposed to toxic levels of the pesticide.

 

Matt Shardlow, chief executive of Buglife said: "Earlier this year a paper was published linking the decline of Monarch butterflies in the USA to neonicotinoids in field margins.

 

"The new University of Sussex research makes it clear that eye wateringly high concentrations of deadly insecticides have been frequent in hedgerow plants in the UK and it seems highly likely that this has been damaging the populations of hundreds of wild insects."

 

While planting wild flower field margains has been promoted by the Government as a solution to the pollinator crisis, Mr Shardlow said they do not help ’solitary bees, or provide nesting habitats’ due to the habitat being ploughed or sprayed off with herbicides before they complete their lifecycle.

 

He said: "The restoration of wildflower meadows to create corridors of quality pollinator habitats, as proposed and guided by the national B-Lines scheme remains the strategy most likely to halt and reverse the loss of pollinators and grassland biodiversity.”

 

This study comes a week after a Canadian study found high levels of neonicotinoids in the surface dust of arable fields and evidence that this dust blows into adjoining fields contaminating them and putting surface living predatory beetles at risk.

 

 


Read More

Don't miss this week's arable news highlights - April 29 Don't miss this week's arable news highlights - April 29
French MPs vote for outright ban on neonicotinoid use French MPs vote for outright ban on neonicotinoid use
Making the most of field margins Making the most of field margins
Neonicotinoid impact could be '1,000 times worse' than first thought Neonicotinoid impact could be '1,000 times worse' than first thought
NFU seeks OSR neonicotinoid derogation for autumn 2016 NFU seeks OSR neonicotinoid derogation for autumn 2016

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS