Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Hints & tips: How to limit the spread of pink eye in housed ewes

Eye conditions can become a problem when bringing ewes inside to lamb, with ewes’ heads coming into much closer contact than at any other time.


Laura   Bowyer

TwitterFacebook
Laura   Bowyer
TwitterFacebook
Share This

Hints & tips: How to limit the spread of pink eye in housed ewes


Read More

Agriculture experts recognised in Queen's New Year Honours list Agriculture experts recognised in Queen's New Year Honours list
Farm accounting: Everything you need to know Farm accounting: Everything you need to know
Hints & tips: How to make your farm meetings more productive Hints & tips: How to make your farm meetings more productive
How to breathe life into 'zombie assets' on your farm How to breathe life into 'zombie assets' on your farm

How to limit the spread of pink eye:

  • Close contact at troughs allows the infection to spread rapidly so ensure sheep have adequate trough space - 45cm/head for troughs and 15cm/head for ring feeders
  • Do not stock too densely
  • Sheds should be well ventilated
  • Shelter should be provided for out-wintered stock.
  • Quarantine purchased stock

Kirsten Williams, beef and sheep consultant at SAC Consulting says there are three main eye conditions in ewes, all of which can be associated with harsh winter weather and housing.


She says eye conditions are particularly problematic for ewes in late pregnancy, and can lead to blindness.


The most common condition is Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis, more commonly known as ’pink eye’. This is often related to bad weather such as driving snow or high winds but also dust which may be in hay.

It is a contagious condition, caused by one of two species, either Chlamydia Psittaci or Mycoplasma Conjunctivae.


Mrs Williams says: “It can be identified as tear stains on the face, cloudy eyes, a dislike to bright lights and the eye can become inflamed and pink, depending on the length of infection. There are often carrier animals within flocks which transmit the organisms to other sheep in the flock.”

 

Anterior Uveitis, also known as ‘silage eye’, is a condition often linked to feeding big bale silage to sheep caused by a conjunctival infection from Listeria Monocytogenes and can be displayed as cloudy eyes.


Mrs Williams says: “To limit the risk of the condition, freshly opened big bale silage should be offered to the animals and silage should not be out of its wrap for more than three days. The condition is more common when sheep are pushing their heads into the bale so unrolling bales along a feed barrier is likely to reduce the risk of disease compared to using a round feeder.”


The third condition Mrs Williams highlights is Periorbital Eczema which occurs when the skin around the eye is damaged allowing entry of Staphylococcus aureus and can often occur when there is not adequate room at troughs or ring feeders. It results in swollen eyes and blocked vision due to large scabby lesions forming around the eyes.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS