Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Lack of capacity at British ports could push up food prices post-Brexit

A lack of capacity at UK ports could see shoppers face food shortages and soaring prices after Brexit, according to a leading trade association.


Abi   Kay

TwitterFacebook
Abi   Kay
TwitterFacebook
Share This

Lack of capacity at British ports could push up food prices post-#Brexit

The British Retail Consortium has released a report which warned a failure to invest in physical, as well as digital, infrastructure to handle a new EU-UK customs regime would cause massive disruption for consumers – though it could provide import substitution opportunities for UK farmers.

 

The paper pointed out Dover currently handles 10,000 freight movements a day between the UK and the continent, but it has no capacity to hold consignments which need customs clearance – something which could become commonplace after Brexit.

 

The estimated cost of holding a delayed driver with a refrigerated lorry at a port is £500 per day, adding cost and interruption to supply chains.

 

Challenge

 

The report read: “Ensuring UK and EU ports are ready for a new customs system is key. In the UK, investment is needed in port capacity, roads, warehouses and IT systems to ensure the new Customs Declaration System (CDS) is ready for the challenge in 2019.”

 

Concerns around the issue of transporting food were also raised.

 

“The role of haulage in transporting goods across customs borders should not be underestimated”, the paper said.

 

“To reduce further delays, the UK and EU will need to strike deals on the movement of trucks or lorries, vehicle registration and the ability of drivers who are EU nationals to drive vehicles into the UK and vice versa if a customs border is created between them at some point after 2019.

 

“The UK and EU must also reach agreement on health and veterinary checks, security and VAT to ensure goods can move between markets as efficiently as possible.”


Read More

Lack of post-Brexit planning in EU set to hit UK food exports Lack of post-Brexit planning in EU set to hit UK food exports

BRC recommendations to ease post-Brexit movement of goods

  • Get agreements on security, transit, haulage, VAT and people
  • Get mutual recognition on veterinary, health and other checks with the EU
  • Get early clarity for business on what the transitional conditions will be
  • Invest in IT to deliver the Customs Declaration System (CDS)
  • Encourage co-ordination between agencies and ports and borders
  • Invest in capacity and staff at ports
  • Give all companies, particularly small and medium sized enterprises, access to the customs ‘fast track’ – or Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) status
TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS