Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

Late-drilled spring cereals may benefit from nutrient boost

Insufficient rooting is likely to put late-drilled spring cereals under stress, according to agronomy business Agrovista, which believes foliar feeding will be necessary where soils conditions are poor.


Abby   Kellett

Twitter Facebook
Abby   Kellett
Twitter Facebook
Share This

Late-drilled spring cereals may benefit from nutrient boost #springcropping

Although most spring cereals are now planted, many have only been drilled in the last two to three weeks.

 

With soil conditions challenging, these crops have struggled to develop an adequate rooting system, so there is a danger plants will not receive enough nutrients from soil to support early growth.

 

Chris Martin, Agrovista technical manager, says: “This is particularly problematic in heavy soil types where water has failed to drain away beneath the soil surface.

 

“Although seedbeds look fine on the surface, a couple of inches down they are puddled, wet and have poor structure.

 

“Seedbeds have effectively capped this wet, deep layer, so it is not going to dry out in a hurry.

 

See also: Managing spring crops to reduce weed burden

 

“This is a pretty harsh environment for young roots. Crops are at risk of significant stress during the rapid growth likely to be associated with this warmer spell of weather. I predict we will see May yellows soon.”

 

Foliar feeding late-drilled crops will help plants establish, says Mr Martin.

 

“Roots are going to be stunted and slow growing and will not be able to deliver sufficient nutrients from soil. We will need to feed leaves, rather than roots, to help these young plants.”

 

Sulphur, magnesium, manganese and potassium are among nutrients crops may be short of this spring. However, advice is only to treat crops in response to tissue and soil analysis, as every field could differ.

 


Read More

Asparagus growers predict lower yields due to delayed harvest Asparagus growers predict lower yields due to delayed harvest
Avoid drilling pulses until soil conditions favourable Avoid drilling pulses until soil conditions favourable
CropTec Preview: Measure to manage CropTec Preview: Measure to manage
Early disease control and nitrogen keys to preserving OSR potential Early disease control and nitrogen keys to preserving OSR potential
Higher soil nitrogen supply levels expected Higher soil nitrogen supply levels expected

Encouraging rooting

Encouraging rooting

Since phosphate is a key driver of root development, Frontier agronomist Andrew Roy believes applying foliar phosphite will be key in encouraging nutrient uptake.

 

He says: “Phosphates can be helpful in improving early root growth of spring cereals and this could fit in well with PGR, barley yellow dwarf virus and manganese applications.”

 

Additionally, growers should be focused on recovering any known trace element deficiencies, such as copper, zinc and manganese, as they have an important role in crop establishment, he says.

 

Although foliar feeding is likely to provide a direct source of nutrients to plants, Mr Roy advises growers to ensure there is sufficient leaf above soil surface to absorb any foliar application, as some crops have just recently germinated.

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS