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Major Yorkshire potash mine to begin construction in 2016

The fertiliser mine is set to become the UK’s first new mining project in the past 45 years


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The Yorkshire potash project aims to create fertiliser for farmers' use
The Yorkshire potash project aims to create fertiliser for farmers' use

Construction is set to begin on a major new Yorkshire fertiliser mine next year following approval by planners.

 

The project, which produces potash, is situated in the North York Moors National Park and will reportedly create the UK’s first new mine in the past 45 years.

 

Experts believe it could be one of the world’s largest in terms of potash extracted. It is set to extract 10 million tonnes of polyhalite, used as a fertiliser, per year. This is likely to grow to 20m tonnes per year.

 

In an update, Sirius Minerals, the mine’s developer, said a decision notice from the North York Moors National Park Authority which granted planning permission for the company’s mine and transport system had been issued.

 

Chris Fraser, managing director and chief executive of Sirius, said: “We are delighted to be through this key approvals process and to now be moving into the delivery phase of this world class Project.

 

“On behalf of everyone at Sirius, I want to thank the thousands of people who have supported the project to date and we look forward to beginning construction during 2016.”

 

Sirius is currently finalising its definitive feasibility study but said the decision notice was a major milestone concluding four years’ planning work.

 

Many in the farm sector have suggested the project could be significant for the UK’s domestic fertiliser industry. The project has been valued by some at £3.15 billion and is expected to create more than 1,000 jobs at full production.


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