Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Maris Piper shows blight resistance in trials

A genetically improved potato designed to have resistance to late blight has successfully come through the first year of field trials.

 


Marianne   Curtis

TwitterFacebook
Marianne   Curtis
TwitterFacebook

The field trial, conducted by The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) in Norwich, involves incorporating late blight resistant genes from a wild potato relative into a cultivated Maris Piper potato.

 

Professor Jonathan Jones of TSL says: “The first year of the Maris Piper field trial has worked brilliantly. We’ve observed resistance to late blight in all the lines.”

 

Three genes

 

The potato modification involved addition of three genes that enable late blight detection. After the first year of the field trial, scientists observed a marked improvement in late blight resistance.

 

Because the resistant lines carry three different added detection genes, it will be more difficult for the pathogen to evade detection and infect the crop. In effect, the potatoes will have more lines of defence against the disease, according to Prof Jones.

 

Alongside resistance to blight, in field trials next year the modified Maris Piper will also carry traits that improve tuber quality. Two genes will be switched off in the plant, a process known as silencing. This means that the new crop will be less prone to bruise damage, making it easier to ensure the potatoes meet customer quality specifications, says TSL.

 

Less blackening

 

The second trait, caused by silencing an invertase gene, leads to lower levels of reducing sugars on storage at low temperatures, which will reduce blackening and formation of acrylamide when potatoes are cooked at high temperatures – for instance when cooking chips or crisps, it adds.

 

This work is being carried out on a BBSRC-funded Horticulture and Potato Initiative (HAPI) grant, in partnership with Simplot Plant Sciences in the USA and with BioPotatoes Ltd in the UK.


Read More

European Commission recommends 5-year glyphosate licence renewal European Commission recommends 5-year glyphosate licence renewal
Fresh thinking needed to take industry forward Fresh thinking needed to take industry forward
GM crops ‘essential to avert future food shortages’ GM crops ‘essential to avert future food shortages’
New product labels tighten laws further on CIPC application New product labels tighten laws further on CIPC application
Rethinking potato blight control programmes to combat resistance Rethinking potato blight control programmes to combat resistance

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS