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More than just an engine tweak for latest Case IH combines

Recent updates to Case IH’s 140 series combines only really addressed the engines to meet emissions. However, for 2016 the engineers have been busy and comprehensively overhauled the guts of the machine. James Rickard reports.



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Last year saw Case IH make many updates to its combine range, with most revolving around its larger series, the three-model 240. This year sees the firm has turned its attentions to its smaller 140 series, with a whole raft of updates to improve usability and performance.

 


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Larger headers

Larger headers

Up-front, the ability for the combines to cope with 5.5-12.5 meter (18-41 feet) cutting width headers, including draper-type headers, has resulted in the feeder housing being beefed up along with increased lifting capacity from the lift cylinders.

 

For greater piece of mind, two stone traps now occupy either end of the feeder housing.

Concaves

Concaves

For easier handling and faster changes, all concaves, now a total of six, have been halved in size.

 

As well as increased convenience, multiple concaves allow an increase in versatility with the ability to mix and match them to the changing conditions and requirements. This was something which was in need of addressing for European farmers who tend to grow ‘small’ grains, in comparison to the large grains of the US, says the manufacturer.

 

Further access is also afforded to the concaves via the re-positioning of the clean grain and returns elevators on the right hand side of the machine.

Cleaning

Cleaning

To cope with the increased capacity from its tuned rotor (one of last year’s developments), a new six-auger bed replaces the old five auger transfer unit, increasing transfer capacity by 10 per cent.

 

Increased sieve capacity has been achieved thanks to a new, automatic hillside compensation system. As well as the longitudinal motion of the cleaning sieves, the sieves also move from side to side with the aim of producing a more even layer of grain over the sieves, rather than bulking up on one side.

 

The Cross Flow Cleaning System, as Case IH calls it, is activated automatically when needed and deactivated when not. An onboard gyroscope tells the system when it is on a slope and the angle of that slope. No operator input is necessary to operate the system, which compensates for slopes up to 12 per cent.

Residue management

Residue management

Updates to the chopping unit now allow switching from chopping to swathing via a button, either from the cab or from the side of the combine. In addition, speed of the chopper can be changed manually from the right hand side of the combine, without tools or belt changes.

 

Thanks to hydraulic drive rather than belts, spread pattern can also be adjusted on the go by altering the spreading disc’s speed, allowing the ability compensate for wind by biasing the spread pattern towards the left or right of the machine.

 

The whole spreading unit can also be swung out for easier access and maintenance.

Tracks

Tracks

Like their big brothers, the 140s can now be specified with tracks. However, whereas the bigger 240s get in-house designed units, Case IH has outsourced its track option for the 140s.

 

While the manufacturer could have developed its own track units for the 140s, it says the low requirement for tracks on this size of combine did not justify Case IH developing its own. It adds the track units used on the larger machines would have not been a viable option, as a heavier duty axle on the 140s would have needed to be developed to cope.

 

Instead, Case IH has chosen Zuidberg as its preferred partner offering tracks integrated into the current axle of the combine, relieving the combine drive hub of structural forces. Tracks are available in widths of 610mm and 762mm, which remain within an overall combine width of 3.5m. Larger 900mm wide tracks are available.

 

Tracks are dampened via suspended idler bogies and afford more comfort and reduced soil compaction, says the manufacturer. The tracks can also be retrofitted, should you want to switch from wheels to tracks.

Transmission

Transmission of the 140 has also been fettled resulting in a two speed mechanical transmission coupled to a two range hydrostatic pump.

 

Gone is the clunky lever which used to be used to change gear, and in with a rotary dial to electrically select between the two mechanical speeds – one for road and one for field.

 

Shifting between the two hydrostatic ranges is done automatically, changing up when the pressure of the oil in the system gets low, and changing down when the pressure increases – on a hill, for example.

 

Top speed is 30kph for the top two models and 25kph for the smallest machine.

 

Pre season orders are now being taken for the new machines, with delivery in 2016.

140 series line-up

Model

Engine

Rated power

Maximum power

Grain tank capacity

5140

6.7-litre, FPT

275hp

312hp

8,800 litres

6140

8.7-litre, FPT

328hp

400hp

10,570 litres

7140

8.7-litre, FPT

375hp

449hp

10,570 litres

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