Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Arable Farming Magazine

Arable Farming Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

British Farming Awards

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
Login or Register
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now
New to Farmers Guardian?
Register Now

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days
Already a Member?

Login | Join us now

New field station makes space for innovative crop science

A new facility to assist advances in crop science is taking shape in the Norfolk countryside.

 


Marianne   Curtis

Twitter Facebook
Marianne   Curtis
Twitter Facebook
Share This

A new facility to assist advances in crop science is taking shape in the Norfolk countryside.

The field experimental station at Church Farm, Bawburgh, will allow scientists at the John Innes Centre to carry out ground-breaking research in crop improvements.

 

Bringing together lab and field research in one location will further research in understanding how genes control plant growth in the field.

The aim is to create tools for plant breeders to produce new varieties that are more reliable, nutritious and resilient to pests and diseases.

 

Different seasons

 

Cathy Mumford, who leads the field experimental team at the John Innes Centre, explains why the new facility is needed.

 

“It means researchers can investigate crop genetics and their effects in an environment in which farmers would grow their crops, where every season is different, unlike a glass house or controlled environment.”

 

“Researchers will be able to benefit from lab and field facilities that are side by side, and there will be a range of facilities under one roof.”

 

The 1700sq.m building includes two laboratories, climate-controlled grain storage, office space for six staff, meeting rooms and storage space for agricultural equipment.

 

 


Read More

Adama gains crop protection products as part of ChemChina/Syngenta deal Adama gains crop protection products as part of ChemChina/Syngenta deal
On the hunt for top linseed growers On the hunt for top linseed growers
Root rot spreads across all pea-growing regions Root rot spreads across all pea-growing regions
SOYL launches ‘largest ever’ UK variable rate nitrogen trial SOYL launches ‘largest ever’ UK variable rate nitrogen trial
Yorkshire sugar beet factory could head to Spain Yorkshire sugar beet factory could head to Spain

Most of the funding for the £4.3m facility comes from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), with a contribution from the John Innes Foundation.

 

Laboratory facilities

 

Research facilities include a plant processing “dirty” laboratory where scientists can process crop samples taken from the trials fields, a “clean” laboratory which will provide access to high grade scientific facilities; and freezer storage for plant tissue samples down to minus 80degC.

 

The facility is central to the John Innes Centre strategy to deliver BBSRC-funded research on plant health, genes in the environment and designing future wheat, a cross institute programme spanning eight research institutes and universities.

 

Much of the land associated with the site is farmed by Morley Farms Ltd a commercial arm of the Morley Agricultural Foundation which supports farming in the East of England by funding agricultural research and educational projects.

Twitter Facebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS