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Consumers switch back to traditional Christmas meats

Turkey and gammon made a comeback in 2016

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Consumers switch back to traditional Christmas meats

Shoppers made the switch back to ‘traditional’ Christmas meats in 2016, according to data from Kantar Worldpanel.

 

In 2015, special promotions led to a rise in the amount of consumers opting for ‘non-traditional’ meats such as beef and lamb, but the volume of meat on promotion fell by 22 per cent year on year, with the volume of lamb sales down 11 per cent in 2016. The volume of beef sales stayed steady, with a fall of 0.1 per cent.

 

The amount of turkey sold increased by 6 per cent and gammon saw growth of 10 per cent as consumers traded down to cheaper meats, following a 10 per cent rise last year.


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Volume performance

Beef joints

-0.1%

Lamb joints

-11%

Pork joints

+4%

Gammon

+10%

Turkey

+6%

Chicken

-2%

 

Data: Kantar WorldPanel

Expenditure on pork joints grew by 9 per cent year on year with bigger and more expensive joints adding value rather than driving people away.

 

Convenience

 

Convenience was also key for shoppers last year, with more people buying products such as turkey crowns and joints which now account for 55 per cent of turkey volume sales and ‘ready-made’ products such as pigs in blankets continued to grow.

 

Retail sales from meat, fish and poultry reached £415m in the four weeks ending January 1.

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