Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Establishing a route to best OSR yields

Variety type, growth habit, sowing flexibility and depth control have proved some of the most important establishment factors associated with high oilseed rape (OSR) yields, a recent national study has shown.


Abby   Kellett

TwitterFacebook
Abby   Kellett
TwitterFacebook

The Dekalb study of more than 120 producers from across the country took place in June and gathered information on variety type, sowing date, establishment regime and a whole range of management practices alongside typical establishment rates and five year average yields.

 

The aim of the study was to provide growers with up-to-date benchmarking information to help them optimise OSR establishment.

 

Of the farms involved, around half were growing hybrids and half pure line varieties.


Read More

Focusing on efficiency for profitable future Focusing on efficiency for profitable future
Frontier invests in Kent hub Frontier invests in Kent hub

Minimum tillage was identified as the most popular establishment regime [42 per cent], followed by subsoiler sowing [27 per cent] and some form of deep cultivation ahead of drilling [12 per cent]. Direct drilling was common practice on 9 per cent of farms, strip till drilling on 8 per cent and broadcasting the least popular method, being used by only 2 per cent of participants.

 

Even consolidation, good soil structure and drainage and robust pest control were priorities on more than 70 per cent of farms, according to Dekalb marketing manager, Mark Shaw.

“Also being prioritised by more than half the growers was choosing the most vigorous establishing varieties; sowing by soil condition rather than calendar date; sowing by seed number rather than weight; and achieving a consistent depth of sowing.”

 

Mr Shaw identified a change in priorities differ, depending on the establishment system.


“Far more subsoiler sowers than min-tillers are prioritising vigorously establishing varieties, variety development speed matched to sowing date, seed rates adjusted to variety type and sowing regime, and the most effective cereal straw management. More are using seedbed fertiliser too, while less appear concerned about sowing depth consistency.”

Overall, the Dekalb study recorded average establishment rates of 83 per cent and five year average yields of 3.95 t/ha (1.6t/acre).

 

While there was no obvious correlation between yield and soil type or establish regime, those achieving the yields of 4.5t/ha (1.82t/acre) or more tended to grow a higher proportion of hybrid varieties.

Key Establishment Differences on Higher Output Farms

Higher Output Farms

Lower Output Farms

Five year average yield

4.5 t/ha or more

3.5 t/ha or more

Average establishment rate

86%

77%

Proportion with greater than 50%
of crop area in hybrid varieties

67%

56%

Proportion with greater than 50%
of crop area in pure line varieties

33%

44%

Proportion prioritising sowing by soil condition rather than calendar date

72%

40%

Proportion prioritising achieving a consistent depth of sowing

56%

40%

Proportion prioritising matching

variety development speed to

sowing date

40%

24%

Proportion prioritising sowing by
seed number rather than weight

72%

56%

Proportion prioritising adjusting
seed rate to variety type and
sowing regime

52%

44%

 

Mr Shaw says: “Markedly more of the higher output growers are putting over half their winter OSR area into hybrids. The lower output farms are continuing to place relatively greater reliance on pure lines.


“At the same time, the higher output growers were placing noticeably more priority on sowing by soil condition rather than calendar date; matching variety development speed to sowing date; sowing by seed number rather than weight; and, achieving a consistent depth of sowing. They also appear to be more flexible in adjusting their seed rates to variety type and sowing regime.


“Interestingly too, the higher output growers clearly seem less concerned about using seedbed fertiliser than the lower output farms. Perhaps this is because, with the establishment rates they are typically achieving – an average of 86 per cent against the 77 per cent of those with lower outputs – they don’t see such a strong need for extra support.”

 

The three most common ways in which growers felt they could improve their establishment was by being more vigilant when slug pelleting, sowing earlier where conditions allow and better rolling when possible.

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS