Farmers Guardian
Topics
How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

EU under pressure to reduce ‘high and complex’ agricultural tariffs

Six influential countries, including the US and Australia, are piling pressure on the EU to reduce its tariffs on agricultural goods – tariffs the UK is set to replicate after Brexit.

TwitterFacebook
Share This

EU under pressure to reduce ‘high and complex’ agricultural tariffs

According to AgraEurope, trade diplomats from the two countries, as well as those from Argentina, Brazil, Canada and New Zealand, criticised the union’s high and complex tariffs at a recent World Trade Organisation (WTO) meeting.

 

The Government has promised to keep tariffs the same as the EU’s – at least initially – to ‘minimise disruption to global trade’ after Brexit, but the UK is sure to face the same pressure to reduce them as it becomes a WTO member in its own right.

 

The NFU said it would have ‘serious concerns’ about this as production standards across WTO members vary significantly.

 

Urging

 

Tom Keen, the union’s Brexit and international affairs adviser, said: “We are urging the Government to seriously take into account the production standards of imported produce when negotiating trade deals and to ensure UK farmers upholding high standards are not put at a competitive disadvantage to overseas producers subject to different standards.

 

“This applies when agreeing any tariff rates – Most Favoured Nation tariffs [for WTO members] – or those under any future trade deals.”

 

At the WTO meeting, Brazil raised concerns about 138 per cent tariffs on oilseeds and 146 per cent tariffs on fruit and vegetables, as well the EU’s refusal to include ethanol and beef in the potential new trade deal with the Mercosur bloc of which it is a member.

 

Slammed

 

Higher tariffs on processed products and steep out-of-quota duties were also slammed.

 

A European Commission spokesman told Farmers Guardian the discussion was ‘frank but moderate’.

 

“It is important to emphasise the EU is today the world’s largest importer of agricultural products and has concluded and continues to negotiate ambitious free trade agreements to reduce agricultural tariffs in bilateral trade”, he added.

 

“The EU import regime for agricultural products is fully transparent and predictable and is contained in the EU’s schedule, as accepted and bound as part of the Uruguay Round Agreement.”


Read More

Agricultural trade to be discussed alongside Brexit ‘divorce bill’ Agricultural trade to be discussed alongside Brexit ‘divorce bill’
Drop tariffs on food produced outside the UK for low prices, says Gove Drop tariffs on food produced outside the UK for low prices, says Gove
EU attitude to Brexit ‘hardening’ as MEPs push for tariffs EU attitude to Brexit ‘hardening’ as MEPs push for tariffs
EU considers ‘punishing’ British farmers in trade deal if UK drops regulatory standards EU considers ‘punishing’ British farmers in trade deal if UK drops regulatory standards
Exports to EU would 'probably' decline if new tariffs are erected, Defra Secretary concedes Exports to EU would 'probably' decline if new tariffs are erected, Defra Secretary concedes

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS