Farmers Guardian
News
Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

Word ‘milk’ banned for use in branding of plant-based products

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

This Is Agriculture - Sponsored

DataHub

DataHub

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

First light leaf spot symptoms in OSR a month ahead of last season

The first confirmed light leaf spot symptoms of the 2019/2020 season have been identified by Bayer’s SpotCheck initiative.

TwitterFacebook
Light leaf spot image courtesy of ADAS
Light leaf spot image courtesy of ADAS

Light leaf spot was identified on October 25, 2019 in Derbyshire and Angus, with samples later positively identified in the Scottish Highlands, Oxfordshire, Yorkshire and Norfolk.

 

According to Bayer, the results suggest there may be a lot of latent infection in OSR this autumn, which is expected to further develop if temperatures do not fall in the coming months.

 

The SpotCheck results to date do not come as a surprise to Philip Walker, ADAS arable plant pathologist, who cites above average rainfall in September and October as being a key driver of light leaf spot infections.

 

He says: “Last season initial infections were almost a month later (end of November 2018). Finding samples of light leaf spot so much earlier this season suggests there is a lot of latent infection in the crop, and we will see more and more symptoms developing if temperatures don’t drop in November and December.”

 

Ella Crawford, Bayer commercial technical manager for Suffolk, adds the SpotCheck results may be of particular significance for earlier drilled crops, which are at greater risk of light leaf spot infection.

 

“Oilseed rape crops remain a mixed bag, with many areas experiencing extensive flea beetle damage and being written off before incurring further input costs. However, there are a number of more forward, lush crops particularly those drilled early August. These crops will be at higher risk of light leaf spot infection, because the crop is exposed to ascospores for a longer period of time.

 

“In Suffolk, we are seeing phoma lesions on a large proportion of crops, and a small number of reports of light leaf spot symptoms. However, I would encourage growers and agronomists to utilise SpotCheck to understand the scale of latent infections and treat crops more effectively as a result.”

 


Read More

Light leaf spot disease pressure buildsLight leaf spot disease pressure builds
Light leaf spot risk remains relatively low after relatively dry start to 2019Light leaf spot risk remains relatively low after relatively dry start to 2019
Main light leaf spot epidemic beginsMain light leaf spot epidemic begins

More information

For more on the SpotCheck initiative visit: cropscience.bayer.co.uk/spotcheck

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS