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Forage Aid organisers seeking new regional recruits

Organisers of Forage Aid are on the hunt for new regional co-ordinators and hauliers to help with its charitable aims.

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Forage Aid organisers seeking new regional recruits

Set up in the wake of spring snow of 2013, Forage Aid plays a key role in providing farmers in tough situations with the feed and bedding they need to survive.

 

Those interested in becoming regional co-ordinators would become the face of Forage Aid in their area, working closely with representatives from RABI and The Farming Community Network (FCN).


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The role would support the charity at a local level to ensure its aims and objectives could be carried out effectively during times of crisis. This volunteer role would only be called upon in times of crisis and while there is no salary or honorarium, travel expenses are available.

 

It also needs hauliers to come forward so it can create a central database which it can call upon in times of need.

 

Each haulier would work closely with Forage Aid haulage logistics co-ordinator, Branston (Lincoln), and regional co-ordinators on the ground.

 

Forage Aid co-founder Andrew Ward said: "These people will be our eyes and ears on the ground. In the past we have relied on word of mouth, but often farmers who are facing hardship are too proud to ask for help. It means getting help to those people is extremely difficult.

 

"Mr Ward added local knowledge was critical.

 

"If we have people who know those areas and the logistics to enable hauliers to get there, it makes the whole process a lot more effective," he said.

 

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