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India and China lead global vegetable trade

But the majority of vegetables were still grown for domestic consumption


Alex   Black

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Alex   Black
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India and China lead global vegetable trade

India and China have emerged as major players in vegetable imports as global trade increases.

But exports still only make up around 5 per cent of vegetables grown worldwide, according to
Rabobank’s latest vegetable market report.

 

The Netherlands has benefited from increased trade across Europe, and both the Netherlands and Spain will be looking for a favourable Brexit deal to protect their trade flows into the UK.

 

Morocco has also emerged as a major supplier of fresh vegetables into Europe, while Mexico is becoming a ‘vegetable garden’ for North America.

 

China and India

 

Rabobank research analyst Cindy van Rijswick highlighted vegetable imports to India and China had risen sharply. Both countries were also massive producers, accounting for two-thirds of world output.

 

Seventy per cent of all vegetables grown globally were sold as fresh, unprocessed products and 5 to 10 per cent were processed.

 

The popularity of canned and jarred vegetable products has fallen, but processed salads have grown in popularity, with Rabobank expecting products offering a combination of freshness and convenience to continue to grow.

 

Reports on health benefits also drove consumption, with EU imports of ‘superfood’ sweet potatoes tripling over the last four years.

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