Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Poultry planning restrictions cause angst among farmers

Disparity between planning applications and local authorities has come to light after three separate requests for poultry units have landed different outcomes.


Lauren   Dean

TwitterFacebook
Lauren   Dean
TwitterFacebook
Share This

Poultry planning restrictions cause farmer angst

An application to build four poultry units to house up to 225,000 broilers in Faintree, Bridgnorth was given the go-ahead less than a week before a shed capable of housing 16,000 hens in Haddington, East Lothian was rejected.


It came as an egg business in The Leigh, Gloucester continued to be left hanging more than two years after its initial proposal for three poultry units to house up to 155,000 chickens.


CLA head of planning Fenella Collins said the rural economy would be helped by such developments but warned planning systems were often seen as a burden to farmers.


She said: “Each planning application should be and is determined on its own merits.


Read More

Bird flu could hit European poultry exports Bird flu could hit European poultry exports
Global poultry industry 'on road to recovery' Global poultry industry 'on road to recovery'
Is the poultry sector for you? Is the poultry sector for you?
Poultry farmers cut antibiotic usage by 44 per cent, report shows Poultry farmers cut antibiotic usage by 44 per cent, report shows
Scottish planning system must better recognise farmers’ role Scottish planning system must better recognise farmers’ role

“The burden of proving why a development proposal should be granted permission lies with the applicant and this means that farmers have to front-load their planning applications but without any guarantee they will achieve a favourable outcome.

 

Investment

“That said, developments of this size do create new jobs in the area and the rural economy will benefit as a result.”


Surrounding neighbours in all three cases said there were ‘too many concerns’ in the community but the farmers in question argued there was a need for more poultry housing.


Ms Collins said farmers must be sure of their decision before making such an investment due to frequently aired concerns over noise, odour and impact on local country roads.

 

“We hear of farmers who can spend upwards of three years obtaining planning permission for chicken buildings,” she added.

 

“The time and money that has to be spent on achieving a planning permission is very high indeed and this demonstrates why there is a general view amongst farmers that the planning system acts as a very real constraint on their investment decisions.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS