Farmers Guardian
Topics
How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

How to spot BSE and what farmers can do to prevent it

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2020

LAMMA 2020

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Risk of potato blight ramped up in Scottish crops

During a week of almost back-to-back Hutton periods Scottish Agronomy has found a wave of active blight foci in Scottish crops.

Conditions were blight conducive throughout Scotland’s potato growing areas for the last week of July with spores present and active.

 

According to Scottish Agronomy’s Eric Anderson this marks the start of a heightened period of risk.

 

“This week we’ve submitted two samples from volunteers and four from crops to the AHDB ‘Fight Against Blight’ service. So far this season blight’s been a non-event but it has now kicked off big time.

 

"To keep on top of it growers need to step up frequency of inspection and be ready to adapt programmes to regain control.”


Read More

EuroBlight conference 2019: Late blight control threats EuroBlight conference 2019: Late blight control threats
In-season blight strain detection to help inform decisions In-season blight strain detection to help inform decisions
Talking roots with Darryl Shailes: Aggressive blight strain is too serious to ignore Talking roots with Darryl Shailes: Aggressive blight strain is too serious to ignore

Control

 

Where active foliar blight is found in a crop, Scottish Agronomy recommends products or mixtures with both anti-sporulant and tuber blight activity.

 

To bring blight under control intervals also need to be narrowed to three to four days until actively sporulating lesions ‘dry up’.

 

Most product labels do not allow for an interval of less than 7 days so this has to be achieved by alternating between them Mr Anderson says.

 

He adds a fungicide like Infinito (fluopicolide + propamocarb) at 1.6 L/ha combines tuber blight, anti-sporulant and curative activity, but should be alternated with other fungicides with anti-sporulant activity.

 

Options will depend on how many applications of QiI fungicides – amisulbrom and cyazofamid – have already been used. For resistance management Qils should not form more than 50% of the programme.

With some crops now just a fortnight away from desiccation Mr Anderson also emphasises the importance of maintaining tuber protection until haulm is completely dead.

Resistance

 

“Do not use fluazinam because of resistance in 37_A2. The only two fungicides containing active substances considered to have good tuber blight activity are cyazofamid.”

 

If by the final two to three sprays the crop is blighted, Mr Anderson says growers must remember that the role of fungicide applications is not just to protect tubers.

 

“It is also to reduce the amount of viable inoculum in the crop. Consolidating cracked ridges with a ridge roller and ensuring complete haulm desiccation to prevent re-growth can reduce the risk of tuber blight.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS