Farmers Guradian
Topics
Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

Nine ways to keep your farm vehicles safe

DataHub

DataHub

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Dairy Farmer Magazine

Auction Finder

Auction Finder

British Farming Awards

British Farming Awards

CropTec

CropTec

LAMMA 2019

LAMMA 2019

You are viewing your 1 free article

Register now to receive 2 free articles every 7 days or subscribe for unlimited access.

Subscribe | Register

Schmallenberg virus hits UK on 'much bigger scale'

This week animal health chiefs predicted the resurgence of Schmallenberg following its prevalence in 2012/13, as new cases were reported across the UK.


Lauren   Dean

TwitterFacebook
Lauren   Dean
TwitterFacebook
Share This

Schmallenberg virus hits UK on 'much bigger scale'

AHDB Dairy’s lead veterinary science expert Derek Armstrong said the UK was particularly at risk from Schmallenberg (SBV) due to its ’sandwich position’ between Ireland and the Netherlands-Belgium border, where there have been a number of confirmed reports.

 

Cases have already been confirmed by the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) in Devon, Dorset, Cornwall, Somerset, Co Laios and Co Cork, with more instances arising in Worcester, Gloucester, Pembrokeshire, Cheshire, Northampton and Carmarthenshire.

 

SBV causes major abnormalities in new-born animals, including birth defects and twisted limbs in lambs and calves. It can also cause adult sheep to have early abortions.


Read More

Farmers must lead call for Schmallenberg vaccination Farmers must lead call for Schmallenberg vaccination
Farmers urged to seek Schmallenberg confirmation Farmers urged to seek Schmallenberg confirmation
Farmers warned of Schmallenberg Virus after circulation in Scotland Farmers warned of Schmallenberg Virus after circulation in Scotland
Research into Schmallenberg virus: Complete the questionnaire Research into Schmallenberg virus: Complete the questionnaire
Robust surveillance network should be on 'front foot' Robust surveillance network should be on 'front foot'

It came as bird flu continued to spread across the UK.

 

 

"It is expected SBV will be found in the later lambing season," Mr Armstrong said. "Milder weather conditions earlier in November were a perfect platform for the midge-borne virus to breed and prolong the period of infection."

 

Testing

He said while a vaccine had been formulated, it was not licensed in the UK.

 

But farmers have been urged to take suspected SBV-infected lambs and calves for testing at a veterinary investigation (VI) centre, to encourage pharmaceutical companies to produce the vaccine and gain a license for use in next year’s lambs.

 

The National Sheep Association (NSA) said despite circulation of more suspected cases, the 'true picture of the problem' could not be found until incidents were confirmed by post-mortem.

An APHA spokesperson said: “Advice to farmers is that Schmallenberg virus (SBV) remains a threat in 2017 and vigilance should be maintained for signs of fever and milk drop in dairy cows and for deformed lambs and calves.

 

“Vets can advise on how best to manage the risk on farms, including making business decisions about diagnostic testing to confirm presence of disease.”

TwitterFacebook
Post a Comment
To see comments and join in the conversation please log in.

Most Recent

Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Facebook
Twitter
RSS