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Scots to introduce BVD positive status

’Not-negative’ statuses to change to ’positive’ in Scotland.


Laura   Bowyer

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Laura   Bowyer
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From April 10 Scottish cattle herds with animals tested positive for BVD virus will see their BVD status change from ’not-negative’ to ’positive’.

 

This ’positive’ status will only apply when there is evidence of a persistently infected (PI) animal alive in the herd. Once this animal has been removed from the holding, or the animal has been re-tested, allowing the presence of the virus to be ruled out, the BVD herd status will revert to ’not-negative’.

 

Penny Johnston, animal health and welfare policy manager for NFU Scotland, commented: “While this does not actually introduce any additional controls for those herds now designated as BVD positive, it is an important step in recognising that any herd which retains a live persistently infected (PI) status is known to have BVD so must be considered a positive herd and cannot hide behind a more ambiguous ‘not-negative’ status.


“It is a small change but one which we hope will make people think twice before holding onto a PI animal. If we are to get on top of BVD in Scotland, all PI animals need to be removed from herds as soon as possible.


“The BVD advisory group, which NFU Scotland sits on, will be meeting later this month to look at what new sanctions and controls are needed to help tighten up some of the gaps in the current programme and help us move that bit closer to a BVD clear national status.”

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